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Teacher Program Handbook

Welcome to the Teacher Education Handbook. This resource provides candidates, faculty, and staff with information and documents designed to assist in the successful completion of the teacher education program. You will find information, instructions, and required forms related to program requirements.

Conceptual Framework

The University of Phoenix College of Education Conceptual Framework provides a structure for all of our education programs. It is the guiding structure for the design, implementation and evaluation of our programs, and sets expectations for teaching and learning by our faculty and candidates. It focuses on the elements shared by quality educational professionals.

College of Education Conceptual Framework Summary Document

Conceptual Framework is the basis for all coursework in College of Education programs.

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Professional Expectations

Candidates in P-12 College of Education programs at University of Phoenix participate in one or more field placements as part of their academic program. Degree candidates interact with students, parents, school staff and others in the community during the field experiences. As prospective educators/administrators, College of Education candidates are expected to represent the University as professionals and adhere to the ethics and standards of their profession as well as the University’s Student Code of Conduct. Candidates’ dispositions will be evaluated throughout the program.

Supplemental Standards

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX SUPPLEMENTAL STANDARDS
FOR CANDIDATES IN COLLEGE OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Candidates in a College of Education program leading to certification or licensure at University of Phoenix are subject to greater scrutiny because of their anticipated interactions with students, parents, and the school community. These degree candidates participate in one or more clinical experience placements (field placements) and a culminating clinical practice (student teaching practicum) as part of their academic program. As prospective educators, College of Education candidates are expected to represent the University as professionals and adhere to the ethics and standards of their profession as well as the University’s Student Code of Conduct.

The following Supplemental Standards for Candidates in P-12 College of Education Programs (“Supplemental Standards”) apply to these candidates before, during, and after their field placements. The Supplemental Standards address a candidate’s affective attributes and disposition to be an educator/administrator. Review the Professional Dispositions Rubric for additional guidance.

A candidate’s ability to satisfactorily meet the Supplemental Standards is a matter of ongoing academic judgment made by faculty, campus staff, and campus management.

  1. The candidate contributes to a positive climate in the University classroom and all field placements.
  2. The candidate demonstrates mastery of written and spoken language for self-expression, as well as for effective interaction in all settings.
  3. The candidate is a thoughtful and responsive listener.
  4. The candidate is committed to reflection, assessment, and learning as an ongoing process and believes that all students can learn.
  5. The candidate is willing to give and receive help.
  6. The candidate is sensitive to community and cultural norms for the degree program, the University classroom, and all field placements.
  7. The candidate appreciates and values human diversity and shows respect and fairness for others’ varied talents and perspectives.
  8. The candidate values the development of critical thinking, independent problem solving, and performance capabilities in himself/herself and those with whom he/she interacts.
  9. The candidate demonstrates a commitment to keeping abreast of new ideas and understanding in the education field.
  10. The candidate demonstrates a level of responsibility and ethical judgment appropriate for a professional educator/administrator.
  11. The candidate maintains the highest ethical standards in interactions with faculty, students, and staff, as well as in preparation and submission of required course work, and the completion of tests.
  12. The candidate maintains a pattern of exceeding minimal requirements in course and field placements.

When it is determined that a candidate falls short of meeting any of the above Supplemental Standards, faculty, campus staff, or campus may file a Referral Form with the Office of Special Services (OSS). Any candidate who receives one or more referral(s) shall be counseled, remediated, or withdrawn from the program, as appropriate.

Candidates who are separately charged with violating the Student Code of Conduct shall be subject to the policies, procedures, and sanctions for processing such charges. However, a charge under the Student Code of Conduct may also be the basis for a referral on separate academic grounds under these Supplemental Standards. Similarly, an observation under the Referral Process may be the basis for a Student Code of Conduct charge.

Academic Progressions

Academic Progressions are a tool that allows the University of Phoenix an opportunity to provide identified students with a streamlined, templated coaching process. Specifically, Academic Progressions apply to students in the following circumstances:

  • Non-passing grade in a B or better course
  • Unsuccessful attempt at the Dispositions Assessment
  • Unsatisfactory MyTimeLog (MTL) submissions of field experience hours

The Academic Progression process encourages self-reflection through guided questions and offers specified remediation resources that students can complete independently. In the past, students with the above deficiencies were supported through the Supplemental Standards referral process. While the Supplemental Standards process remains in place for students with dispositional concerns or egregious behaviors, the goal of the Academic Progression process is to offer an expedited mode of self-guided support.

Professional Dispositions Rubric

Note: This document complements the Supplemental Standards for Candidates in College of Education Programs.

Standard*Description of "At Standard" Indicators
1. The candidate contributes to a positive climate in the University classroom and all field placements. Participates actively in class discussion and assignments; works effectively with others; shows respect of and consideration for the thoughts and feelings of others.
2. The candidate demonstrates mastery of written and spoken language for self-expression, as well as for effective interaction in all settings. Communicates effectively verbally; demonstrates an ability to write in a clear, organized, fluent manner; adheres to the conventions of the language when appropriate; recognizes distinctions between formal and informal communication.
3. The candidate is a thoughtful and responsive listener. Solicits feedback that demonstrates an understanding of program and professional goals and objectives; receives feedback in a positive manner and makes necessary adjustments; listens and responds to others.
4. The candidate is committed to reflection, assessment, and learning as an ongoing process and believes all students can learn. Reflects on information provided and demonstrates an ability to apply ideas to his/her own practice or life; able to modify behavior and/or understanding when provided with new information or experience; demonstrates an interest in and commitment to lifelong learning with the belief that all students can learn.
5. The candidate is willing to give and receive help. Volunteers to assist others in the University classroom and/or practicum setting; demonstrates openness to assistance from others. Accepts direction from others and respects authority.
6. The candidate is sensitive to community and cultural norms of the teacher education program, the University classroom, and practicum settings. Uses language that demonstrates sensitivity to others; communicates effectively with peers, instructors, K-12 students, and cooperating teachers; shows an awareness of the context in which s/he is interacting.
7. The candidate appreciates and values human diversity and shows respect and fairness for others' varied talents and perspectives. Listens to others' perspectives in a respectful and fair manner; exhibits an understanding of the complexities of race, power, gender, class, sexual orientation. and privilege in American society
8. The candidate values the development of critical thinking, independent problem solving, and performance capabilities in himself or herself and those with whom he/she interacts. Demonstrates an ability to identify, analyze, and evaluate complex issues; exhibits the ability to solve problems both independently and in cooperation with others; sets and achieves high standards.
9. The candidate demonstrates a commitment to keeping abreast of new ideas and understanding in the education field. Identifies and analyzes important trends in education; looks for opportunities to integrate theory and practice; demonstrates enthusiasm for learning new ideas and strategies; relates class discussions and issues to current events in education.
10. The candidate demonstrates a level of responsibility and ethical judgment appropriate for a professional educator/administrator. Attends all classes, practicum experiences, and required activities and arrives on time; dresses for practicum/clinical experiences in an appropriate manner; communicates in a professional manner regarding extenuating circumstances that may prevent attendance; comes to class prepared. Candidates maintain the confidentiality of communications to which they are privy through their interactions with agencies, staff, and other health professionals.
11. The candidate maintains the highest ethical standards in interactions with faculty, students, and staff, as well as in preparation and submission of required course work, and the completion of assignments. Does not represent the work of others as his/her own; is truthful when making statements about qualifications and competencies; observes contractual commitments and timelines; protects students‘ and families’ rights to privacy and confidentiality; establishes relationships with students, parents co-workers based on courtesy, mutual trust and open communication; respects the uniqueness and characteristics of family backgrounds; acts within the educational and wider community in a way which enhances the status of the profession; promotes the improvement of school/institutional policies; develops an understanding and respect for laws and policies that protect students, parents, families, and communities.
12. The candidate maintains a pattern of exceeding minimal requirements in course and field placements. Attends all required activities and arrives on time; dresses for student teaching and field experiences in a professional manner; communicates professionally to staff, students and families; comes to class prepared; engages students in a variety of learning experiences; respects diversity; volunteers to take on additional responsibilities, as appropriate; participates in professional development opportunities offered in the school setting; maintains privacy and confidentiality

Signature Assignments

The included matrixes identify the Signature Assignments required in the program. Signature Assignments are aligned to program student learning outcomes and provide critical information to help the university ensure students have mastered learning outcomes necessary to be effective practitioners and to assist in the university’s programmatic assessment process. Students will use the knowledge and skills learned throughout the program to complete this assignment. Signature Assignments are required and cannot be changed or deleted.

Clinical Experience (Field Experience)

Clinical Experience (Field Experience) is an important part of any education degree program. The clinical experiences are integrated with content from coursework and allow opportunities for teacher candidates to observe and obtain first-hand experience in P–12 classrooms. It is important for candidates to get a variety of clinical experiences during the program.

Purpose

Field Experience is designed to provide you with the opportunity to observe and interact with experienced teachers, P-12 students, support staff, and administrators in diverse school environments and to participate in professional development activities. It is also your opportunity to make connections that may open the door for a student teaching placement.

Prior to student teaching, field experience enables you to participate in hands-on daily classroom practices such as tutoring and one-on-one, whole-group, and small-group instruction in a variety of grade levels and content areas.

Requirements

Field Experience Overview

Candidates enrolled in the Alternative Pathway Certificate programs must complete a minimum of 60 hours of field experiences.

Note: Alternative Certificate Pathway students in Nebraska must complete a minimum of 100 hours

Beginning with the first course and throughout your program, students in undergraduate and graduate initial teacher licensure degree programs are required to complete a minimum of 100 hours of verified field experience, covering a variety of developmental levels from birth through 18 years of age, prior to student teaching. Approximately 30 of these hours are satisfied through assigned field experience activities in some of your courses, while the remaining hours are completed independently. You may spend no more than 25 hours in the same classroom or with the same teacher.

New Mexico: BSED/ECH students must complete 150 hours of Field experience.  Candidates in the Alternative Certification Pathway programs must complete a minimum of 60 hours of required verified field experience.

  • Nebraska: Alternative Certificate Pathway students in Nebraska must complete a minimum of 100 hours

Teacher candidates will complete a minimum 12-week

California: 15 weeks

Colorado-approved: 15 weeks

Hawaii: 13 weeks/65 days minimum

Nebraska: 14-16 weeks

New Mexico: 16 weeks

Oregon: 15 weeks

Texas: 14 weeks

The majority of your field experience hours should be completed in a variety of developmental levels appropriate for your program. For example, 1st-8th grade for Elementary, birth through 3rd grade for Early Childhood (a balanced mix of experiences in both preschool and primary classrooms) , K-12 for Special Education, and 6th-12th for Secondary. These are only examples and not a comprehensive list. Consult with your Education Program Specialist or campus advisor for additional guidance, as there may be different grade/age ranges appropriate for your program that are not listed in these examples.

Field experiences must be completed in a classroom setting (see Alternative Settings for exceptions). It is required that you schedule field experiences at diverse schools and districts based on varying factors, such as socio-economic level, ethnicity, rural/urban setting, presence of English-Language learners, student ability levels, etc.

Field experience hours cannot be satisfied through student teaching activities, any contracted position (i.e. substitute teaching, teacher’s aide, instructional aide, paraprofessional, etc.), volunteering in your child’s school, coaching, church activities, or scouting. If your state requires more than 100 hours of field experience, 40 of the additional hours may be completed in a substitute teaching role.

The assigned field experience required in your coursework will account for approximately one-third of the required field experience hours needed for your program. Consult with your instructor and course syllabus for complete assignment details. These course-related field experience assignments are not optional. You must complete them as a requirement of your program. See Alternative Settings for more information.

The following matrices will help you identify courses in your program that require a field experience activity.

You are required to note the time spent in each experience, provide a description of the placement, and reflect on the experience. This information should be inserted in My Time Log. Keeping notes by hand in a personal notebook is fine, but to meet program requirements you must summarize these notes in My Time Log. You will be required to submit your record in My Time Log to faculty for review at selected times during your program.

You may spend up to 25 hours in the same classroom or with the same teacher; however, the 25 hours cannot be documented all together in one reflection with one signature. No more than 8 hours can be documented for a single session. Each session you spend in the same classroom or with the same teacher must be documented separately with its own date, site details, reflections, and signature.

Placement Description

Please collect as much information as possible about each school in which you complete a field experience. This information can be obtained through an interview with the classroom teacher or school administrator or the school or district website. There may also be school demographic information found on your state’s Department of Education website.

Reflection

You must write a reflection in My Time Log for each field experience you complete. In 100 to 200 words, describe what you did and/or observed during this field experience. Considering the influence of school, family, and community on student learning, what have you gained from the experience that will help you grow and develop as a teacher? Be sure to note what instructional technology was available and how it impacted student learning.

For field experiences related to coursework, you will be required to complete an assignment in the class related to the field experience. Do not copy and paste your class assignment into My Time Log as your reflection. The reflections entered in My Time Log for those field experiences can be abbreviated.

Always remember that you must conduct yourself in a professional and ethical manner while visiting a school or other venue. Dress appropriately and professionally; treat your hosts with courtesy and respect; and do not share personal information that you may learn about staff, faculty, or students. For further information, review Guidelines for the Classroom.

Below is a chart representing common standards for appropriate professional attire.  As you prepare for your clinical experience and/or clinical practice, please review the “Dos” and “Don’ts” of professional attire listed below.  Please consider that there will likely be exceptions to the attire listed in this chart in an educational setting.  For example, you may find that a suit is only appropriate during an interview or that tennis shoes are allowed on your school’s campus.  Please be sure to review your school site’s expectations for professional attire (which may be listed in an employee handbook) and, when in doubt, always error on the side of more professional dress.

DoDon'tDepends on setting – verify with supervisor
Khakis/Dockers/Dress Slacks, worn at waist ShortsPolo/golf shirts
Skirts, mid-thigh or longer Mini skirts Denim jeans or shorts
Capri pants, mid-calf or longer Leggings or spandex Athletic wear/sweats
Suits Denim/corduroy/leather Hats *
Button down shirts with collars or blouses, short or long sleeve Sweatshirts/hoodies Sneakers/tennis shoes
SweatersCrop tops/midriff exposed/spaghetti straps/tank tops
Dress shoes or dress sandals Flip flops, tennis shoes/sneakers
Clothing with holes, frayed ends
Exposed undergarments (bra straps, boxers), fishnet stockings

* Head coverings for religious purposes are acceptable in any setting.

My Time Log

My Time Log is a web tool for logging, reviewing, and approving field experience hours. It replaces the paper Field Experience Record (FER) and the use of TaskStream for submitting hours. This tool provides an enhanced experience for you, faculty, and staff and allows for better data tracking. Review the following materials to learn more about My Time Log. Contact your Education Program Specialist or campus advisor if you have any questions.”

Formal Evaluations (BSED/ECH only)

Four (4) types of field experience assignments will be formally evaluated throughout your program of study:

  • Observation
  • One-on-One instruction
  • Small-group instruction
  • Whole-group instruction

The formal evaluation for these four field experience will occur at the field experience site and will be completed by the supervising teacher.

  • Review your course syllabus to identify if a field experience evaluation is required for that course and for assignment details.
  • These field experience assignments cannot be changed or deleted
  • Before the supervising site teacher can begin your evaluation, you must go into My Time Log and request that an evaluation form be submitted to the site teacher’s email address (select the appropriate type of evaluation in the Activity field). Inform the site teacher to expect an email with the appropriate field experience evaluation. It is recommended that you request the evaluation through My Time Log several days prior to your scheduled Field Experience to ensure the site supervisor has received the appropriate evaluation form.

Guided Clinical Experience/Field Experience (GCE)

What Is Guided Clinical/Field Experience (GCE)?

GCE is a course requirement in our initial teacher licensure programs.

Candidates will be evaluated on their instruction and impact on student learning in select courses during their program (see sequences below). Candidates are required to instruct at least two group sessions; they may complete two small-group sessions if they are not able to obtain permission to teach in a whole-group setting.

What Is the Student’s Role?

Candidates either work with the Center for Educator Preparation for placement or secure placement on their own as dictated by their district. The Center for Educator Preparation’s goal is to facilitate or place students in four 25-hour placements throughout their program.

Each candidate will work with the Clinical Experience Teacher at the placement site to determine the appropriate lesson and time for the GCE to occur. The 25-hour placement can include the GCE component and may also include traditional clinical experience hours and activities.

For each GCE assignment, the candidate will complete and submit the following:

  1. To the course faculty member, as part of the assignment requirements:
    • Guided Clinical Experience Worksheet
    • edTPA® Lesson Plan Template
  2. To the Clinical Experience Teacher, through My Time Log:
    • Guided Clinical Experience Worksheet
    • edTPA® Lesson Plan Template
    • Guided Clinical Experience Rubric

For instructions on submitting your Guided Clinical Experience in My Time Log, refer to:  Guided Clinical Experience: My Time Log Submission.

All GCE documents are available under the GCE Documents tabs below. Information about the course sequence for each program can also be accessed by clicking on the tabs below.

Program Sequences and GCE Placements for Alternative Pathways

***Courses highlighted in yellow are designated GCE courses.

Alternative Pathway/Elementary Education – (CERT/AP–E 01AZ)

Course ID Course Title Credits Length Prerequisites
MTE/503 Orientation to Alternative Pathway Certificate 01 week
APE/522 Elementary–Effective Learning Climates 36 weeks MTE/503
APE/518 Elementary–Models, Theories, and Instructional Strategies 36 weeks MTE/503
APES/514 Survey of Special Populations 24 weeks MTE/503
SEI/504Structured English Immersion 36 weeks MTE/503
APES/562Assessment and Evaluation 36 weeks MTE/503
APE/537 Elementary–Curriculum and Assessment–Reading/ELA 36 weeks MTE/503
APE/515 Elementary Content Methods 36 weeks MTE/503
ELM/545 Elementary Student Teaching 312 weeks APE/522, APE/518, APES/514, APES/562, APE/537, APE/515, SEI/504
Certificate Requirements: 23 Credits

Alternative Pathway/Secondary Education – (CERT/AP–S 01AZ)

Course ID Course Title Credits Length Prerequisites
MTE/503 Orientation to Alternative Pathway Certificate 01 week
APS/523 Secondary–Effective Learning Climates 36 weeks MTE/503
APS/508 Secondary–Models, Theories, and Instructional Strategies 36 weeks MTE/503
APES/514 Survey of Special Populations 24 weeks MTE/503
SEI/504Structured English Immersion 36 weeks MTE/503
APES/562Assessment and Evaluation 36 weeks MTE/503
APS/542 Secondary–Curriculum and Assessment–Reading Methods 36 weeks MTE/503
APS/559 Secondary Content Methods 36 weeks MTE/503
SEC/545 Secondary Student Teaching 312 weeks APS/523, APS/508, APES/514, APES/562, APS/542, APS/559, SEI/504
Certificate Requirements: 23 Credits

Alternative Pathway/Special Education – (CERT/AP–SE 01AZ)

Course ID Course Title Credits Length Prerequisites
MTE/503 Orientation to Alternative Pathway Certificate 01 week
APSE/559 Foundations of Special Education 36 weeks MTE/503
APSE/578 Sped–Models, Theories, and Instructional Strategies 36 weeks MTE/503
APSE/576 Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders 36 weeks MTE/503
SEI/504Structured English Immersion 36 weeks MTE/503
APSE/575Mathematics Instruction for Sped 36 weeks MTE/503
APSE/570 Sped–Curriculum and Assessment–Reading/ELA 36 weeks MTE/503
SPE/577 Special Education Student Teaching 312 weeks APSE/559, APSE/578 APSE/576, APSE/584 APSE/575, APSE/570, SEI/504

Certificate Requirements: 23 Credits

Program Sequences and GCE Placements for Master of Arts in Education/Teacher Education

***Courses highlighted in yellow are designated GCE courses

MAED/TED–E 08AZ

Course ID Course Title Credits LengthPrerequisites
MTE/001 Orientation to Teacher Education 01 week
MTE/510 Professional Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions 13 weeksMTE/001
MTE/516 Foundations of the Professional Educator 36 weeksMTE/001
MTE/511 Child/Adolescent Growth, Development, and Learning 36 weeksMTE/001
ELM/533 Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 36 weeksMTE/510, MTE/511, MTE/516
ELM/532 Creating an Effective Learning Environment 36 weeksMTE/510, MTE/511, MTE/516
SEI/504 Structured English Immersion
(the course for Hawaii is MTE/553, also 3 credits, 6 weeks)
36 weeksELM/533
MTE/512 Teaching the Exceptional Learner 36 weeks ELM/533
MTE/513 Evaluation and Data Literacy36 weeksELM/533
ELM/534 Elements of Literacy Content and Curricular Knowledge 36 weeksELM/533
ELM/535 Application of Research-Based Literacy Instruction 36 weeksELM/534
ELM/536 Social Studies Content and Curricular Knowledge 36 weeks ELM/533
ELM/538 Mathematics Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksELM/533
ELM/537 Science Content and Curricular Knowledge 36 weeksELM/533
ELM/583 Elementary Clinical Practice 312 weeksELM/533, SEI/504, MTE/512, MTE/513, ELM/535, ELM/536, ELM/538, ELM/537
Certificate Requirements: 40 Credits

MAED/TED–S 08AZ

Course ID Course Title Credits LengthPrerequisites
MTE/001 Orientation to Teacher Education 01 week
MTE/510 Professional Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions 13 weeksMTE/001
MTE/516 Foundations of the Professional Educator 36 weeksMTE/001
MTE/511 Child/Adolescent Growth, Development, and Learning 36 weeksMTE/001
SEC/533 Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 36 weeksMTE/510, MTE/511, MTE/516
ELM/532 Secondary–Creating an Effective Learning Environment 36 weeksMTE/510, MTE/511, MTE/516
SEI/504 Structured English Immersion
(the course for Hawaii is MTE/553, also 3 credits, 6 weeks)
36 weeksSEC/533
MTE/512 Teaching the Exceptional Learner 36 weeks SEC/533
MTE/513 Evaluation and Data Literacy36 weeksSEC/533

SEC/534 Reading in the Content Area 36 weeksSEC/533
Elective Content Area Specific Course SEC/537: Secondary Content and Curricular Knowledge
SEC/535: English/Language Arts Content and Curricular Knowledge
SEC/536: Social Studies Content and Curricular Knowledge
SEC/538: Mathematics Content and Curricular Knowledge
36 weeksSEC/534
MTE/517 Technology Integration for Educators 36 weeks SEC/533, one of the Elective Content Area Specific Courses
SEC/583 Secondary Clinical Practice 312 weeksSEC/532, SEI/504, MTE/512, MTE/513, MTE/517, And One of the Elective Content Area Specific Courses
Certificate Requirements: 34 Credits

Master of Arts in Education Special Education 11AZ

Course ID Course Title Credits LengthPrerequisites
MTE/007 Orientation to Teacher Education 01 week
COM/516 Professional Communications 13 weeks
SPE/513 SPE/513 36 weeksSPE/513
SPE/578 Models, Theories and Instructional Strategies for Special Education 36 weeksCOM/516
SPE/584 Learning Disabilities and Language and Development Disorders 36 weeksSPE/513, SPE/578
SPE/512 Special Education Assessment and Interpretation 36 weeksSPE/584
SPE/576 Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders 36 weeksSPE/512
SPE/574 Characteristics of Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities 36 weeks SPE/512
SPE/544 Characteristics of Emotional & Behavioral Disorders 36 weeksSPE/512
SPE/556 Characteristics of Physical & Health Disabilities 36 weeksSPE/512
RDG/570 Curriculum Constructs and Assessment: Reading and Language Arts for Special Education 48 weeksSPE/512
SEI/500 Structured English Immersion 36 weeks
MTH/575 Mathematics Instruction for Special Education 36 weeks
SEI/503 Advanced Structured English Immersion Methods 36 weeksSEI/500
SPE/594 46 weeks35 credits
SPE/595 Special Education Student Teaching: Part B 46 weeksSPE/594
Program Requirements Credits
Total: 46

Program Sequences and GFE Placements for Bachelor of Science in Education

***Courses highlighted in yellow are designated GFE courses

BSEd/ECH 1AZA

Course ID Course Title Credits LengthPrerequisites
GEN/201 Foundations for University Success 35 weeks
ECH/300 Orientation to Early Childhood Education 01 week
ECH/301 Foundations of Early Childhood Education 35 weeksECH/300
ECH/205 Early Childhood Growth and Development 35 weeksECH/301
ECH/211 Instructional Strategies for Early Childhood Education 35 weeksECH/301
EDU/215 Ethics and Social Responsibility in Education 35 weeksECH/301
ECH/390 Early Childhood Student Teaching Seminar 13 weeksECH/205, ECH/211
ECH/321 Developmentally - Effective Learning Environments 35 weeks ECH/390
ECH/400 Assessment and Evaluation in Early Childhood 35 weeksECH/321
ECH/302 Exceptionalities of the Young Child 35 weeksECH/400
ECH/418 Community and Family Engagement 35 weeksECH/302
SEI/300 Structured English Immersion 36 weeks ECH/418
RDG/351 Early Childhood Literacy Development 35 weeksSEI/300
RDG/416 Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood Language and Literacy 35 weeksECH/302, RDG/351
ECH/416 Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood: Math 35 weeksECH/400
ECH/420 Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood: Science 35 weeksECH/302
ECH/430 Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood: Social Studies 35 weeksECH/302
ECH/435 Methods of Teaching in Early Childhood: Arts & Music 35 weeksECH/302
SEI/301 Advanced Structured English Immersion Methods 36 weeksSEI/300
ECH/498 Early Childhood Student Teaching (Birth-Preschool) 46 weeks
ECH/499 Early Childhood Student Teaching (K through Age 8/Grade 3) 46 weeks
Program Requirements Credits
Total: 63

BSED/E 05AZ

Course ID Course Title Credits LengthPrerequisites
GEN/201 Foundations for University Success 35 weeks
EDU/300 Orientation to Teacher Education 01 week
EDU/301 Foundations of Education 35 weeksEDU/300
EDU/305 Child Development 35 weeks
EDU/311 Models and Theories of Instruction 35 weeksEDU/301
EDU/315 Legal & Ethical Issues in Education 35 weeks
EDU/390 Elementary Education Seminar 13 weeksEDU/300
EDU/321 Classroom Management 35 weeks
EED/400 Assessment in Elementary Education /mark>35 weeks
SPE/300 Orientation to the Exceptional Child 35 weeks
SEI/300 Structured English Immersion 36 weeks
RDG/350 Children's Literature 35 weeks
RDG/420 Elementary Methods -Reading/Language Arts 35 weeksEDU/311

EED/416 Elementary Methods - Mathematics 35 weeksEDU/311
EED/420 Elementary Methods - Science 35 weeksEDU/311
EED/425 Elementary Methods - Health/PE 35 weeksEDU/311
EED/430 Elementary Methods - Social Studies 35 weeksEDU/311, EED/400, SPE/300
EED/435 Elementary Methods - Fine Arts 35 weeksEDU/311, EED/400, SPE/300
RDG/415 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties 35 weeksRDG/420
SEI/301 Advanced Structured English Immersion Methods 36 weeksSEI/300
EED/498 Elementary Student Teaching, Seminar I 46 weeksEDU/321, EDU/390, and 52 credits
EED/499 Elementary Student Teaching, Seminar II 46 weeksEED/498
Program Requirements Credits
Total: 63

What Is the Clinical Experience Teacher’s Role?

The Clinical Experience Teacher will work with the candidate to determine the appropriate lesson and time for the GCE to occur.

The Clinical Experience Teacher will assist the candidate as necessary to support the three components of GCE:

  • Pre-assessment
  • Instruction
  • Post-assessment and reflection

What Is the Faculty Member’s Role?

Faculty members will evaluate the candidate’s GCE assignment based on the completion of the assignment requirements and will provide candidates with coaching to improve their practice.

Arranging Field Experiences

How you arrange field experience activities will vary depending on the procedures of each school district. Some school districts might require that you be formally placed by the University of Phoenix and others might allow you to arrange the hours directly with the school or district.

To determine the appropriate procedure, you must contact the district directly. Be professional in your communication and ask the district what you are required to do in order to conduct field experience in their school district.

School districts always have the discretion on who they allow to conduct field experience activities in their schools. You are not guaranteed a placement for any onsite activities required for your program.

If the district requires it, the university will make a formal field experience request on your behalf. Contact your Education Program Specialist or campus advisor to begin the placement process. This type of placement may take 4 – 6 weeks to complete, so it is important to plan ahead and request these field experiences well in advance.

Family member or friend: It is acceptable to conduct field experience in the classroom of a family member or friend, including teachers of your own children, provided the school district allows. Even though you may have connections in the school or district, you are still considered a visitor. Always act professionally and be sure to follow all field experience requirements and procedures of the school and district.

No connections: If you do not have any connections within the school or district, please communicate your field experience needs with the school district. Your needs may vary depending on factors such as a specific course assignment or grade level of your program.

The school district might require that you complete an additional background check through them and submit verification of clearance of any communicable diseases as part of their field experience procedures.

The school district may also require that you provide documentation from the University of Phoenix about your program and field experience requirements. If this documentation is needed, please request it from your Education Program Specialist or campus advisor.

Guidelines for the Classroom

An abundance of knowledge can be gathered by hands-on experience through participation in P-12 classroom activities. Apply the following guidelines as you conduct each of your classroom field experiences to optimize your learning experience and maximize your educator knowledge base.

Remember to be professional. Your relationships with all school staff (principals, secretaries, teachers, etc.) and students are important in your future career as an educator. Communicate clearly. Dress appropriately. Be courteous and respectful to the principals and teachers who are graciously allowing you into their classrooms. Remember, you are a guest in the school and it is a privilege, not a right, to have access to their campus, faculty, and students. Review Professional Expectations for further information.

Below is a chart representing common standards for appropriate professional attire.  As you prepare for your clinical experience and/or clinical practice, please review the “Dos” and “Don’ts” of professional attire listed below.  Please consider that there will likely be exceptions to the attire listed in this chart in an educational setting.  For example, you may find that a suit is only appropriate during an interview or that tennis shoes are allowed on your school’s campus.  Please be sure to review your school site’s expectations for professional attire (which may be listed in an employee handbook) and, when in doubt, always error on the side of more professional dress.

DoDon'tDepends on setting – verify with supervisor
Khakis/Dockers/Dress Slacks, worn at waist Shorts Polo/golf shirts
Skirts, mid-thigh or longer Mini skirts Denim jeans or shorts
Capri pants, mid-calf or longer Leggings or spandex Athletic wear/sweats
Suits Denim/corduroy/leather Hats *
Button down shirts with collars or blouses, short or long sleeve Sweatshirts/hoodies Sneakers/tennis shoes
Sweaters Crop tops/midriff exposed/spaghetti straps/tank tops
Dress shoes or dress sandals Flip flops, tennis shoes/sneakers
Clothing with holes, frayed ends
Exposed undergarments (bra straps, boxers), fishnet stockings

* Head coverings for religious purposes are acceptable in any setting.

  • Once you have identified the school site to conduct your field experience and have received approval from the appropriate school authority, contact the cooperating teacher to develop a schedule to complete the field experience. Be sure to emphasize that you would prefer to participate in the class during instructional time.
  • Call ahead if you cannot arrive at your scheduled time.
  • Reschedule if your field experience occurs during lunch, recess, a planned field trip, or other events.
  • Bring note taking tools with you to the field experience, such as: notebook, clipboard, pen, pencil, tablet
  • Write down any questions you would like to ask the cooperating teacher, if time permits.
  • Talk with the teacher before class to identify the expected learning outcomes and plan how you can be involved in the classroom activity.
  • Some field experience activities only require (or permit) you to observe. Think of these field experience observations as “active observation”. It means active listening, professional engagement with the teacher, and critical thinking. It is the opportunity for applying theory you have learned in your coursework to real-life practice.
  • Review Observation Techniques for more information.
  • Classroom experiences should be fact-based and unbiased. Your value judgments should not enter the classroom.
  • Learn from the teachers to whom you are assigned; you will see instructional techniques that you will want to replicate and you will see others that you will not want to model. The time that you spend with teachers, students, and classrooms will be invaluable to you as you begin your teaching career.
  • Review Observation Techniques for more information.

Be aware of teachable moments – times when the activity you are participating in doesn’t go quite as planned. Teachers are experts at “seizing the moment.” Make notes to determine if you can identify when the teacher seized a teachable moment and when he/she ignored such opportunities. You will learn a great deal by asking a teacher why certain things occur or do not occur in his/her classroom.

As you take notes during the field experience, be thorough by noting specific details regarding classroom occurrences (e.g., instructional techniques, student responses, etc.), as well as the following basic information:

  • Your name
  • Date of the classroom field experience
  • The name of the school where the field experience occurred
  • The grade level of the students
  • The number of students, teachers, and other adults present during the field experience

Observation Techniques

Before you begin the observation, find a location to sit where you are inconspicuous and will not cause any distractions.

  • Notice the entire school first
    • Location, building age, maintenance, parking, yard, and so on
    • Pay attention to how you are welcomed to the office; sign in as a guest.

When observing in a teacher’s classroom, be alert and aware of the dynamics of the classroom.

General Information

  • Grade
  • Number of children
  • Teacher and teacher’s aide (if there is one)
  • Time and date of visit (include length of visit)
    • How is the classroom set-up?
    • How are the children’s desks arranged?
    • Where is the teacher’s desk located in the classroom?
    • Are bulletin boards, interest centers, and children’s work displayed?
    • Consider the lighting, ventilation, and safety (no blocked doorways, for example). Is the room neat?
    • Are there working computers?
    • Are the computers turned on? Are they being used?
  • Notice the attire.
  • Pay attention to the rapport with children.
  • Take note of the lesson delivery, such as techniques and strategies used.
  • Observe the classroom management style.
  • Can you determine the instructional objectives for the lesson? Is a lesson plan being used?
  • Can you identify the standard or standards being addressed?
  • Does the lesson flow smoothly, or is it interrupted?
  • How are children reacting to and receiving the instruction? Do some students appear to be lost? Are some students inattentive? Is there discussion? Are questions being answered? Is higher-order thinking occurring?
  • Is the discussion including many children, or just a few? Are only the same ones participating?
  • Are children given times to complete their work? What is the teacher doing while the students complete their work? Are students provided with guided practice?
  • What are the obvious behaviors of the children? Are some having trouble? What do the ones who finish early do?
  • Is there an assessment at the end of the period? Is there closure to the lesson?
  • How was the content delivered?
  • If children are conducting research, are there adequate materials? Are children writing in their own words? What is the teacher doing?
  • What did you like about the observation? Why?
  • What would you do differently? Why?
  • Ask the teacher questions about what you observed, if time permits.
  • Follow- up with a thank you note to the teacher you observed.
  • Enter the details of your field experience session into My Time Log as soon as you return home.

Alternative Field Experience Settings

Summer can be a challenging time for teacher candidates to locate appropriate sites for completing course field experience assignments and program field experience requirements. The ideal environment for teacher candidates to complete field experience is in a classroom setting under the supervision of a certified teacher. Some schools and districts have year-round or modified school year schedules. These would be the first choice for summer field experiences. Many schools and districts also offer summer school programs for high-risk or underprivileged students. These also provide optimal field experience opportunities.

Alternatives

  • If a school environment is not available to teacher candidates during the summer months, other acceptable field experiences may be available in the community. Alternative field experience opportunities should be instructor-led educational events for K–12 students. Examples may include but are not limited to the following:
    • Math or science camps, often sponsored by local school districts, colleges, or universities
    • Educational programs at science centers, museums, and zoos

Up to 10 hours of field experience can be logged by taking part in suggested activities, which include the following:

  • Parent–teacher organization meetings (excluding their own child’s school), school board meetings, grade level and content area meetings, and all-school staff meetings and training
  • Workshops and conferences for educators (Teacher candidates can check with local school districts, the state department of education, local colleges and universities, and professional organizations for schedules of events.)

Please Note the Following:

  • You must understand that although you can complete the assignment objectives through an alternative observation, the original field experience assignment in a formal classroom setting must still be fulfilled and documented in My Time Log at a later time. You will not be eligible for student teaching until they are complete.

Clinical Practice (Student Teaching)

Student teaching is an integral component of the teacher preparation program. It provides candidates with a field-based experience at the appropriate grade and content level. Student teachers work with a cooperating teacher from a school site and with a University of Phoenix faculty supervisor. Candidates experience a clinical supervision model during the initial phase of student teaching that utilizes observation, analysis, reflection, and conferencing components.

Additionally, student teachers will be responsible for completing topical assignments designed to demonstrate practical application of skills and knowledge gleaned from program curriculum. The completion of each assignment is scheduled to coincide with faculty supervisor visitations and/or student teaching seminars; the content of these assignments will form the basis for discussion at the visitations and/or during the seminars. The student teaching experience is designed to emphasize the achievement of state-specific standards leading to certification and to present individuals with growth opportunities that best prepare them to assume the duties of a certified classroom teacher.

Policies

Student teaching is a full-time experience.  For students attending a local campus, each campus establishes operational policies related to placement and completion of student teaching. Candidates must follow the guidelines in place at their campus.

    1. Candidates must take the appropriate student teaching courses concurrently with the student teaching experience. If a candidate chooses to postpone the student teaching experience, he/she must postpone enrollment in the corresponding student teaching course(s).
    2. Candidates must earn a “B” or better in each student teaching course. If a candidate receives less than a “B” (B- or lower, or an Incomplete), he/she must repeat the course AND the student teaching experience.
    3. Student teaching and concurrent student teaching course can only be repeated one time.  Candidates must complete a remediation process after their first failed attempt of the course or concurrent experience through Supplemental Standards prior to being eligible for their second and final attempt at student teaching or the concurrent student teaching course.
    4. Candidates enrolled in the MAED/TED program must student teach in either an elementary or secondary setting based on their program specialization. Candidates seeking special education certification must enroll in the MAED/SPE program. Candidates in the MAED/TED program may not student teach in special education.
    5. It is recommended that candidates complete their student teaching block within twelve (12) months from the completion date of their last required course in the program. If candidates defer student teaching for more than one year, they may encounter changes in state examinations and/or other requirements for teacher certification. Candidates will be responsible for complying with any new state credentialing requirements at the time student teaching is completed.
      • Candidates who are contemplating delaying student teaching for more than a year may be subject to additional program and financial implications. Candidates must consult with their Academic and Finance Advisors to discuss their options.
    6. Candidates will complete either a Teacher Work Sample or the edTPA, depending on their program.

Hours Required

Teacher candidates will complete a minimum 12-week

California: 15 weeks

Colorado-approved: 15 weeks

Hawaii: 13 weeks/65 days minimum

Nebraska: 14-16 weeks

New Mexico: 16 weeks

Oregon: 15 weeks

Texas: 14 weeks

Responsibilities

The student teaching experience encompasses several areas, including: orientation, observation, planning, teaching, and evaluation. The initial orientation period will be followed by a time of observation and limited classroom participation. This important phase of the student teaching experience is designed for the student teacher to become acquainted with classroom procedures and materials.

It is essential that the student teacher notify either the University faculty supervisor or cooperating teacher as soon as any concern with assignment(s) arises. During the student teaching experience, the student teacher needs to meet the placed upon other teachers in the school district. This includes following the school district’s calendar, attendance policy, call-in procedures, etc. It is essential that you discuss these expectations with the cooperating teacher at the start of the experience.

If the student teacher is ill and must be absent, he/she must call the University faculty supervisor and cooperating teacher as soon as possible. The student teacher must always have emergency lesson plans available for a substitute teacher. tThe student teacher may not be absent from student teaching in order to attend a job interview. The student teacher must contact the University Campus Administration immediately if he/she cannot complete the student teaching assignment for any reason.

In order to receive full credit for the student teaching experience, the student teacher is required to complete all assignments as noted by the University Faculty Supervisor and in the student teaching seminars. These may include, but are not limited to, the following:

Daily Lesson Plans

Written daily lesson plans are required of all student teachers. The cooperating teacher should be considered a resource person in this effort. The plans should be submitted to the cooperating teacher at least 24 hours prior to teaching the lesson. The student teacher must organize lesson plans in a notebook and make them available to the University faculty supervisor when he/she visits.

Additional Responsibilities

  • Becoming familiar with the school’s programs, calendar, policies, community, consumer base, and specific service offerings.
  • Participating in an observation cycle of master teachers noting routines, student learning styles, teaching style, delivery of curricula, and classroom management.
  • Developing lesson plans collaboratively with the cooperating teacher that satisfy state standards and local school district curricula.
  • Collaborating with the cooperating teacher on designing and implementing the Teacher Work Sample during the student teaching experience.
  • Maintaining informal anecdotal records (noting students’ learning styles, teaching strategies, what works with students, positive experiences, reactions, etc.).
  • Studying the school district’s progress reporting system. The cooperating teacher will model collecting appropriate student class work, diagnosis, and writing/scoring the student progress report.
  • Collecting artifacts and data for the electronic portfolio and maintaining back-up copies of portfolio artifacts.
  • Participating in the professional activities of a classroom teacher.
  • Conferring with and/or observing teaching staff involved with students instructed in special programs or services (speech, English as a Second Language (ESL), Honors (gifted) programs, special education, occupational therapy, physical therapy, etc.).
  • Contacting the cooperating teacher prior to arrival at the school regarding the material he/she will be responsible for at the start of student teaching. The student teacher must prepare any materials, lessons, etc. needed to begin student teaching.
  • Reviewing the school’s regulations. As a “co-teacher” in the system, the student teacher will enforce the student regulations and observe the teacher regulations as if he/she were a contracted teacher in the school.
  • Carefully planning effective lesson plans.
  • Utilizing a variety of teaching methods in the classroom.
  • Providing an effective learning environment for all students.
  • Maintaining effective classroom management procedures.
  • Completing the required number of weeks according to State Department of Education regulations.
  • Notifying both the cooperating teacher and University faculty supervisor if he/she must miss school due to illness.
  • Submitting complete lesson plans to the cooperating teacher if he/she must be absent due to illness.
  • Fulfilling the commitment to student teaching and the school. The student teacher must not request time off to attend other functions such as weddings, job fairs, travel, etc. If he/she is absent due to illness one to five days during the semester, he/she must make up those days before completing student teaching. If he/she is absent for more than five days, he/she must withdraw and retake student teaching and the coinciding student teaching seminar.
  • Completing an end-of-course survey and submitting it to Academic Affairs

The faculty member assigned by the University of Phoenix to supervise individual student teachers through their field experiences and to work collaboratively with the cooperating teacher is an important ingredient in student teaching success. The faculty supervisor serves as an ongoing resource for the cooperating teacher in the school, and monitors and evaluates the student teacher’s progress. This faculty member must have a master or doctoral degree and must have experience in supervision. Faculty supervisors use evaluation instruments, standard observation, feedback, and coaching strategies to assist student teachers in developing their instructional and management skills during their time in the classroom. The faculty supervisor is responsible for observing and evaluating candidates during student teaching. This is accomplished through early and frequent observation and feedback sessions with candidates using the forms provided in the module. It is up to the faculty supervisor to determine each candidate’s supervision schedule in consultation with the candidate’s cooperating teacher to create an individualized plan which best suits the needs of the candidate. The candidate may also indicate a need for more intensive supervision for a period of time or because of issues with a particular skill. It is the University’s intent that all student teaching experiences are individualized based upon a candidate’s performance and progress in the classroom.

The responsibilities of the faculty supervisor are to:

  • Make initial contact with the cooperating teacher.
  • Describe expectations for the student teacher and the role of the designated cooperating teacher.
  • Conduct site visits to each assigned student teacher for the purposes of:
    1. Monitoring student teacher progress in an accurate and timely fashion.
    2. Verifying attendance.
    3. Troubleshooting problem areas.
  • Meet periodically with the cooperating teacher to discuss the student teacher’s performance and to answer any questions.
  • Require the student teacher to notify the faculty supervisor immediately of any emergencies or illness that will result in an absence.
  • Inform the student teacher that missed days must be made up (absence from teaching experience of more than 5 days requires the student teacher to withdraw and re-take student teaching and coinciding student teaching seminar).
  • Immediately notify the University of any concerns related to the student teacher’s performance, the cooperating teacher’s performance, or any other issues that warrant University administrative attention.
  • Communicate clearly and directly with the student teacher at all times. It is imperative that graduates from the program are skillful, knowledgeable, and well prepared. If the faculty supervisor has concerns about the content knowledge or performance of the student teacher at any point in the experience, he/she should immediately report these concerns to the Campus College Chair or Regional Supervisor.
  • Ensure that the cooperating teacher assists the student teacher in developing and implementing Teacher Performance Assessment or Teacher Work Sample.
  • Perform formal and informal evaluations of the student teacher and submit these evaluations to the campus at the appropriate time. This includes a mid-term and final evaluation. The mid-term and final evaluations are submitted to the campus by the due date along with the Student Teaching Final Grade Form.

The cooperating teacher is an integral part of the student teaching experience. The experience and knowledge that the cooperating teacher shares with the student teacher is key to the success of the experience. The cooperating teacher is a classroom teacher designated to oversee, evaluate, and provide feedback to the student teacher on a daily basis. The cooperating teacher should not be a first year teacher, should have at least three years of teaching experience, hold a professional license, and, ideally, will possess a master degree. These supervisors should have demonstrated experience and excellence in classroom management; student engagement; lesson planning, delivery, differentiation, and assessment; and, mentorship of teachers and teacher candidates.  Cooperating teachers will use evaluation instruments, standard observation, feedback, and coaching strategies to assist student teachers in developing their instructional and management skills during their time in the classroom. The University provides a stipend for professional services to the cooperating teacher.

Cooperating teachers are an integral part of the student teaching experience. They are expected to:

  • Facilitate development of the Teacher Performance Assessment or Teacher Work Sample.
  • Provide time for the Teacher Performance Assessment or Teacher Work Sample to be implemented in the classroom.
  • Assist in orienting the student teacher to the school, classroom, and the students, along with school district policies, rules, and regulations.
  • Supervise the student teacher on a daily basis.
  • Phase the student teacher into the teaching/observation cycle. Candidates will begin their experience acting as an observer and will gradually expand their responsibilities in the classroom. The student teacher should be fully in charge of classroom instruction for the final two – three weeks of the experience.
  • Provide prompt and substantive feedback to the student teacher regarding all performance activities and interactions with school personnel, students, and parents.
  • Work with the student teacher to develop a schedule of responsibilities.
  • Set and communicate standards for the daily lesson plans that the student teacher is expected to develop.
  • Review the student teacher’s lesson plans to allow for revisions where necessary.
  • Communicate the student teacher’s progress to the University faculty supervisor via face-to-face discussion or telephone contact. This communication is established by the University faculty supervisor for the purposes of on-going performance review.
  • Complete evaluations of the student teacher’s progress using the forms provided in the module and on the electronic portfolio and submit them to the faculty supervisor after reviewing them with the student teacher.
  • Complete a mid-term and final evaluation using the forms provided by the University, review with the student teacher, and submit them to the University faculty supervisor.
  • Collaborate with the University faculty supervisor to assist the student teacher in developing identified skill and knowledge deficiencies throughout the student teaching experience.
  • Immediately inform the faculty supervisor of any concerns regarding the student teacher.
  • The faculty supervisor can be reached directly and provides a phone number and times of availability.
  • Establish a time to talk with the student teacher about his/her activities, impressions, reflections, suggestions for goals, and areas of improvement.

Student Teaching Evaluations

Secondary Education

Student Teaching Forms

Teacher Work Sample

Teacher candidates who are not completing edTPA are required to complete a Teacher Work Sample during student teaching. The sample requires candidates to plan and teach an instructional unit. It will be developed in conjunction with the cooperating teacher and evaluated by the faculty supervisor/seminar instructor and the cooperating teacher.

Evaluation

The teacher work sample will be evaluated by your seminar instructor. This is scored using a rubric based on seven standards that incorporate the following:

  • Contextual information
  • Unit learning goals
  • Content
  • Assessment plan
  • Pre-assessment analysis
  • Design for instruction
  • Description of two featured students
  • The instructional process of the two featured students
  • Analysis of learning results
  • Reflection on teaching and learning

Successful Teachers

The College of Education’s teacher work sampling model is based on work done by the Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality*. This model suggests that successful teachers:

  • Support students’ acquisition of substantive learning by designing units of instruction that employ a range of strategies that build on each student’s strengths, needs, and prior experiences.
  • Align learning goals with state and district content standards.
  • Adjust the classroom environment and instruction to address important contextual characteristics of the classroom.
  • Employ a variety of instructional resources to help students attain learning goals and to offer them new opportunities to explore important ideas or to learn new skills that have relevance to their lives.
  • Use multiple assessment methods that appropriately measure learning gains toward the selected goals.
  • Explore students’ understanding and thinking processes while evaluating the effectiveness of their teaching.
  • Analyze student learning by examining individual, small group, and whole class achievement.
  • Use their analysis of student assessment to guide instruction, to provide feedback to students, and to plan for professional development.
  • Provide credible evidence of their instructional effectiveness through student performance.

*Adapted from Pokay, P., Langer, G., Boody, R., Petch-Hogan, B., and Rainey, J., Renaissance partnership for Improving Teacher Quality and Western Oregon’s Teacher Work Sample, 2001.

Seven Standards of the Renaissance Teacher Work Sample

The teacher uses information about learning/teaching context and student individual differences to set learning goals and objectives, plan instruction, and assess learning.

  • Knowledge of community, district, school, and classroom factors
  • Knowledge of characteristics of students
  • Knowledge of students’ varied approaches to learning
  • Knowledge of students’ skills and prior learning
  • Implications for instructional planning and assessment

The teacher sets significant, challenging, varied, and appropriate learning goals and objectives.

  • Significance, challenge, and variety
  • Clarity
  • Appropriateness for students
  • Alignment with national, state, and/or local standards. Students should refer specifically to their state’s curriculum goals, content standards, and grade-level benchmarks as appropriate.

The teacher uses multiple assessment modes and approaches aligned with learning goals and objectives to assess student learning before, during, and after instruction.

  • Alignment with learning goals and objectives and instruction
  • Clarity of criteria and standards for performance
  • Multiple modes and approaches
  • Technical soundness
  • Adaptations based on the individual needs of students

The Teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals and objectives, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

  • Alignment with learning goals and objectives
  • Accurate representation of content
  • Lesson and unit structure
  • Use of variety of instruction, activities, assignments, and resources
  • Use of contextual information and data to select appropriate and relevant activities, assessment, and resources
  • Use of technology

The teacher uses on-going analysis of students learning to make instructional decisions.

  • Sound professional practice
  • Adjustments based on analysis of student learning
  • Congruence between modifications and learning goals and objectives

The teacher uses assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.

  • Clarity and accuracy of presentation
  • Alignment with learning goals and objectives
  • Presentation of aggregated and disaggregated data
  • Accuracy of analysis of data
  • Evidence of impact on student learning

The teacher analyzes the relationship between his or her instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice.

  • Interpretation of student learning
  • Insights on effective instruction and assessment
  • Alignment among goals and objectives, instruction, and assessment
  • Implications for future teaching
  • Implications for professional development

edTPA Overview

Many candidates are required to complete a Teacher Performance Assessment as part of their program and/or to meet state certification requirements. If you are unsure whether or not you need to complete edTPA please consult your education program specialist.

edTPA is a pre-service teacher assessment process designed by professional teachers to prepare teacher candidates with the skills necessary to maximize their students learning potential. edTPA is comparable to  professional licensing exams (i.e. bar exam, registered nurse exam, architect exam) that demand applications of skills in the profession. In order to prepare and assess these candidates, edTPA includes a edTPA includes multiple assessments of teaching (planning, instruction, assessment and analyzing teaching). Each assessment is aligned with Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards, Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) standards, and the Common Core State Standards.

For more information, review additional edTPA resources found under the Toolkits in the navigation pane above.