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California Teacher Program Handbook

Welcome to the California Teacher Education Handbook. This resource provides candidates, faculty, and staff with information and documents designed to assist in the successful completion of the California teacher education program. The Handbook contains information, instructions, and required forms related to program requirements.

UOPX’s California Teacher preparation programs, which lead to certification, are approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. If at any point in the program you move to another state, your ability to continue in your program will be impacted. You must immediately update your current address with the University whenever a change occurs. You must also contact your Academic Advisor to ascertain the effect upon your program. You are encouraged to contact your Academic Advisor upon contemplating an address change to understand the effect of the change upon your ability to progress in the program.

Conceptual Framework

The University of Phoenix College of Education Conceptual Framework provides the philosophical foundation and structure for developing educational professionals, centered around themes of professional practice. The themes are reflected in and emphasized throughout coursework, candidate assessment, clinical experience, and clinical practice as appropriate. The University of Phoenix College of Education vision is to prepare teachers with knowledge, skills, and dispositions aligned with the themes of professional practice in order to positively impact student learning with a dedication to equity and access for all students.

College of Education Conceptual Framework Summary Document

Keep each Conceptual Framework themes, or “pie piece,” in mind when exploring course topics. Consider the alignment between these theme(s) and course topics and objectives.

Click the Conceptual Framework image below to learn more and explore each theme

Educational Professional Img

CA Teaching Performance Expectations

California teacher candidates must demonstrate the pedagogical knowledge and skills required to teach the state-adopted TK-12 content standards and curriculum frameworks (the standards outlining what children must learn in each content area and grade level). This pedagogical knowledge is defined for teacher candidates in the state-adopted Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). The California TPEs set the rigor and expectation for all beginning teachers to demonstrate their ability to be strategic in planning, implementing, and evaluating instruction in their focused content areas.

The California TPEs, adopted in 2016, consist of six (6) domains:

  • Engaging and Supporting All Students in Learning 
  • Creating and Maintaining Effective Environments for Student Learning
  • Understanding and Organizing Subject Matter for Student Learning
  • Planning Instruction and Designing Learning Experiences for All Students
  • Assessing Student Learning
  • Developing as a Professional Educator

Candidates are assessed on their ability to demonstrate each TPE element during course work, a TPE Portfolio, clinical experience, clinical practice (student teaching), and in the capstone program assessment, edTPA. To be recommend for a Preliminary Teaching Credential, candidates must demonstrate mastery of all TPEs.

TPE Program Alignment

The University of Phoenix BSLS & MAED/TED CA programs are aligned to the California Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs) to help students develop competency in the TPEs. The documents linked below show the alignment of the courses in the BSLS & MAED/TED CA programs to the California TPEs. Click on the desired program to access the alignment.

BSLS v4

MAED/TED-E v8-v9CA

MAED/TED-S v8-v9CA

Purpose of TPE Portfolio

The TPE Portfolio is designed to solidify the connection of the California Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs) to every aspect of planning, delivering, assessing, and adapting content for all students in an engaging learning environment.

Requirements

Candidates will align course assignments and clinical experiences with each of the TPE domain elements and address how the activities show evidence of mastering the specific TPE. This portfolio is a project that spans the entire program, and candidates are encouraged to consider portfolio contents, as they complete each course and clinical experience. Ultimately, the TPE Portfolio is submitted at two points during the program.

TPE Portfolio Document

TPE_Evidence_Portfolio_Rubric.docx

TPE Evidence Portfolio Submission Document

Program Progression Requirements

Set deadlines for  progression requirements are included in the program as a way of scaffolding, supporting, and monitoring teacher candidates toward successful completion of the credential program. These progression requirements ensure that candidates meet all state and program requirements to be appropriately prepared, approved, and cleared to enter a K-12 environment.

Level 1 Progression Requirements

MAED/TED students must submit the following items for admission into the program:

  • Proof of an undergraduate degree with a minimum GPA of 2.5 from a regionally accredited institution
  • All documents required by the University (i.e. New Student Checklist, Enrollment Agreement, etc.)
  • Proof of a negative tuberculosis (TB) report based on California requirements
  • Additional immunizations: Requirements may vary by district, and candidates should contact the school district for a list of the immunizations required prior to clinical practice/student teaching.
  • Evidence of Certificate of Clearance or similar CTC-issued document – California students must complete two steps to submit their fingerprints:
    1. Complete the Live Scan fingerprinting process as outlined by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC). Review Credential Leaflet 900 for the required form.
    2. Complete the application process for the Certificate of Clearance.

Completion of a course (two semester units or three-quarter units) in the provisions and principles of the U.S. Constitution with a grade of “C” or better, a degree posted transcript from California State University, or pass an approved U.S. Constitution examination given by a regionally accredited college or university.

  • Effective 7/1/2020, any new enrollments, re-enrolled or re-entry student must complete the US constitution course as a part of the program (MAED/TED 09CA).
  • Bachelor’s students must submit the following items for admission into the program:
    • All documents required by the University (i.e. New Student Checklist, Enrollment Agreement, etc.)

Level 2 Progression Requirements

MAED/TED students must complete all Level 1 progression requirements and the following elements for teacher licensure prior to the 12th credit in the program of study:

  • Basic Skills proficiency – Met by any of the following:
    • Passing the CBEST exam
    • Passing all three subsets of the CSET: Multiple Subject exam and the CSET: Writing Skills test
    • Achieving a qualifying score on the SAT or ACT
    • Passing the CSU Early Assessment Program or CSU Placement Exams
    • Passing the AP English and AP Calculus or AP Statistics exam, OR
    • Passing a basic skills exam from another state
    • Meet the Basic Skills Requirement by Coursework (requires Credential Analyst review – UOPX Approved Course List)
    • Meet the Basic Skills Requirement by Coursework and Exam (requires Credential Analyst review – UOPX Approved Course List)
  • Progression towards completion of subject matter competence by one of the following methods:
    • Passing the appropriate CSET subject matter examination(s).
    • Attempting the appropriate CSET subject matter examination(s).
    • Registering for the next scheduled CSET examination.
    • Completing a CTC-approved subject matter preparation program.
    • Elementary candidates a conferred undergraduate degree in Liberal Studies, or coursework covering all domains of the subject matter. Transcript Analysis required.
    • Secondary candidates a conferred undergraduate degree in the content area of the credential they are seeking (English/Language Arts, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, Physical Education, Visual Arts), or coursework covering all domains of the subject matter. Transcript Analysis required.

BSLS students must complete all Level 1 progression requirements and the following elements for teacher licensure prior to the completion of EDU/301CA:

  • Complete all general education credits
  • Proof of a negative tuberculosis (TB) report based on California requirements
  • Evidence of Certificate of Clearance or similar CTC-issued document – California students must complete two steps to submit their fingerprints:
  • Basic Skills proficiency – Met by any of the following:
    • Passing the CBEST exam
    • Passing all three subsets of the CSET: Multiple Subject exam and the CSET: Writing Skills test
    • Achieving a qualifying score on the SAT or ACT
    • Passing the CSU Early Assessment Program or CSU Placement Exams
    • Passing the AP English and AP Calculus or AP Statistics exam, OR
    • Passing a basic skills exam from another state
    • Meet the Basic Skill Requirements by Coursework (requires Credential Analyst review – UOPX Approved Course List)
    • Meet the Basic Skill Requirements by Coursework and Exam (requires Credential Analyst review – UOPX Approved Course List)
  • Progression towards completion of subject matter competence by one of the following methods:
    • Passing the appropriate CSET subject matter examination(s).
    • Attempting the appropriate CSET subject matter examination(s).
    • Registering for the next scheduled CSET examination.
    • Completing a CTC-approved subject matter preparation program.
  • Coursework covering all domains of the subject matter. Transcript Analysis Required.

Preferred Course Sequences

Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies (BSLS 04CA)

Course IDCourse TitleCreditsLengthPrerequisites
GEN/201Foundations for University Success35 weeks
EDU/300CAOrientation to Teacher Education01 weekCritical Thinking , English Proficiency
EDU/301CAFoundations of Education35 weeksCompletion of all general education requirements
EDU/305CAChild Development35 weeksEDU/301CA
EDU/311CAModels and Theories of Instruction35 weeksEDU/305CA, EDU/301CA
RDG/420CAElementary Methods: Reading and Language Arts35 weeksEDU/301CA
ELL/300Instruction and Assessment of English Language Learners35 weeksEDU/301CA
SPE/300CAOrientation to the Exceptional Child35 weeksEDU/301CA
EDU/321CAClassroom Management35 weeksEDU/301CA
TPA/100TPA Planning and Instruction13 weeksELL/300 , SPE/300CA
EED/436CAElementary Methods: Social Science and Fine Arts35 weeksEDU/301CA
EED/438CAElementary Methods: Mathematics and Science35 weeksEDU/301CA
TPA/200TPA Instruction and Assessment13 weeksTPA/100 , EDU/311CA
EED/491CAElementary Clinical Practice A47 weeksAll previous coursework
EED/492CAElementary Clinical Practice B47 weeksEED/491CA
Program Requirements:Credits:
Required Course of Study40
Total:40

Master of Arts in Education/Elementary Teacher Education (MAED/TED-E 09CA)

Course IDCourse TitleCreditsLengthPrerequisites
MTE/001Orientation to Teacher Education01 week
MTE/510Professional Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions13 weeksMTE/001
MTE/516Foundations of the Professional Educator36 weeksMTE/001
MTE/511Child/Adolescent Growth, Development, and Learning36 weeksMTE/001
ELM/533Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners36 weeksMTE/510 , MTE/511 , MTE/516
ELM/532Creating an Effective Learning Environment36 weeksMTE/510 , MTE/511 , MTE/516
ELL/500Instructional Methods for English Language Learners36 weeksELM/533
MTE/512Teaching the Exceptional Learner36 weeksELM/533
RDG/556Elements of Literacy Content and Pedagogical Knowledge36 weeksELM/533
MTE/513Evaluation and Data Literacy36 weeksELM/533
ELM/536Social Studies Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksELM/533
ELM/537Science Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksELM/533
ELM/538Mathematics Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksELM/533
ELM/539Physical Education/Health Content and Curricular Knowledge24 weeksELM/533
HIS/518U.S. Constitution24 weeks
ELM/586Elementary Clinical Practice A37 weeksELM/532 , MTE/513 , ELM/538 , ELM/539 , RDG/556 , ELL/500 , MTE/512 , ELM/536 , ELM/537
ELM/587Elementary Clinical Practice B37 weeksELM/586
Program Requirements:Credits:
Total:44

Master of Arts in Education/Secondary Teacher Education (MAED/TED-S 09CA)

Course IDCourse TitleCreditsLengthPrerequisites
MTE/001Orientation to Teacher Education01 week
MTE/510Professional Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions13 weeksMTE/001
MTE/516Foundations of the Professional Educator36 weeksMTE/001
MTE/511Child/Adolescent Growth, Development, and Learning36 weeksMTE/001
SEC/533Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners36 weeksMTE/510 , MTE/511 , MTE/516
SEC/532Secondary - Creating an Effective Learning Environment36 weeksMTE/510 , MTE/511 , MTE/516
ELL/500Instructional Methods for English Language Learners36 weeksSEC/533
MTE/512Teaching the Exceptional Learner36 weeksSEC/533
RDG/558Secondary Content Area Literacy36 weeksSEC/533
MTE/513Evaluation and Data Literacy36 weeksSEC/533
MTE/517Technology Integration for Educators36 weeksSEC/533
HIS/518U.S. Constitution24 weeks
SEC/586Secondary Clinical Practice A37 weeksMTE/513 , MTE/517 , RDG/558 , SEC/532 , ELL/500 , MTE/512
SEC/587Secondary Clinical Practice B37 weeksSEC/586

In addition to the courses listed above, secondary candidates are required to complete a Secondary Subject Matter Elective course aligned to their certification field. This subject matter methods course is completed prior to  clinical practice (student teaching).

California secondary subject matter methods courses are listed below:

Course IDCourse TitleCreditsLengthPrerequisites
SEC/535English/Language Arts Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksSEC/533
SEC/536Social Studies Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksSEC/533
SEC/538Mathematics Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksSEC/533
SEC/540Science Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksSEC/533
SEC/539Physical Education Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksSEC/533
SEC/541Visual Arts Content and Curricular Knowledge36 weeksSEC/533
Program Requirements:Credits:
Total39

Professional Expectations

Candidates in TK-12 College of Education programs at University of Phoenix participate in several clinical placements as part of their academic program. Degree candidates interact with students, parents/caregivers, school staff, and others in the community during the field experiences. As prospective educators, College of Education teacher candidates are expected to adhere to the following and to the ethics and standards of their profession as well as the University’s Student Code of Conduct.

  1. The candidate is committed to reflection, assessment, and learning as an ongoing process.
  2. The candidate believes that all students can learn and succeed and is adaptable to differentiated instruction.
  3. The candidate maintains positive collaborative interpersonal interactions with faculty, students, and the school community.

Candidates’ dispositions will be evaluated throughout the program.

Supplemental Standards

University of Phoenix Supplemental Standards for Candidates in P-12 College of Education Programs

Candidates in a College of Education program leading to certification or licensure are subject to greater scrutiny because of their anticipated interactions with students, parents/caregivers, and the school community. These degree candidates participate in one or more clinical experience placements (field placements) and a culminating clinical practice (student teaching practicum) as part of their academic program. As prospective educators, College of Education candidates are expected to represent the University as professionals and adhere to the ethics and standards of their profession as well as the University’s Student Code of Conduct

Supplemental Standards for Candidates in College of Education Programs apply to candidates through all aspects and interactions in the program including courses, clinical experiences (field experience) and clinical practice (student teaching).  Supplemental Standards address a candidate’s affective attributes and disposition to be an educator. A corresponding Professional Dispositions Rubric provides additional guidance. A candidate’s ability to satisfactorily meet the Supplemental Standards is a matter of ongoing academic judgment made by faculty, campus staff, and campus management.

Supplemental Standards for Candidates

  1. The candidate is sensitive to community and cultural norms that pertain to the University classroom and off-site activities and locations.
  2. The candidate contributes to a positive climate in the University classroom and all off-site activities and locations.
  3. The candidate adheres to College, clinical, and agency site policies and procedures.
  4. The candidate participates in off-site activities consistent with their respective professional practice, including satisfactory performance of all required skills specified.
  5. The candidate meets all state-mandated requirements for certification and/or licensure.
  6. The candidate only engages in practice for which they have been authorized or for which they have been educated/validated.
  7. The candidate appreciates and values human diversity and shows respect for others’ varied talents and perspectives.
  8. The candidate values the development of critical thinking, independent problem solving, and performance capabilities in themself and those with whom they interact.
  9. The candidate demonstrates mastery of written and spoken language for self-expression, as well as for effective interaction in all settings.
  10. The candidate is committed to reflection and assessment and is open to receiving feedback.
  11. The candidate is willing to give and receive help.
  12. The candidate is a thoughtful and responsive listener.
  13. The candidate maintains a pattern of meeting requirements in courses and external placements.
  14. The candidate demonstrates a commitment to keeping abreast of new technology, ideas and understanding in their chosen field.
  15. The candidate demonstrates a level of responsibility and ethical judgment appropriate for a professional in their field.
  16. The candidate is responsible for personal transportation to and from off-site activities.
  17. The candidate maintains professionalism and confidentiality in all settings, including virtual settings.
  18. The candidate is committed to establishing a safe and supportive environment.

Educator Licensure Professional Standards

Candidates in a program leading to certification or licensure interact with students, parents, and the school community and participate in field placements and student teaching practicums as part of their academic program and are required to adhere to the following:

1. The candidate is committed to reflection, assessment, and learning as an ongoing process.

2. The candidate believes that all students can learn and succeed and is adaptable to differentiated instruction.

3. The candidate maintains positive collaborative interpersonal interactions with faculty, students, and the school community.

Upon notice that a candidate may not be meeting one or more of the Standards, the College will review the information, the candidate’s history, and any additional information that will assist in appropriately addressing the issue(s) presented. If the respective College determines that a candidate may not be meeting one or more of the Standards, they may file a Referral.

Referrals provide the College the opportunity to review the candidate’s behavior and determine whether counseling, remediation, or withdrawal from the program is appropriate. The process is designed to be remedial in nature, as the goal is for candidates to understand what is expected of them to be successful in their profession.

If at any time during the process the candidate fails to meaningfully participate, the College may recommend the student be withdrawn from the program. Program withdrawals must be approved by the College Dean.

Candidates are not permitted to have representation by an attorney or any other third party at any time during the process.

This process is separate from the Student Code of Conduct disciplinary process, but they may run concurrently. Candidates charged with violating the Student Code of Conduct are subject to the policies, procedures, and sanctions under that policy in addition to these standards.

A Student Code of Conduct charge may be the basis for a Referral if the underlying incident indicates these Standards have not been met. Similarly, a Referral may be the basis for a Student Code of Conduct charge.

Candidates are not subject to expulsion for a Standards violation, only for a violation of the Student Code of Conduct if found responsible.

A detailed outline of the Supplemental and Professional Standards Referral Process & Procedures can be found in the Academic Catalog (starting on page 118).

Academic Progressions

Academic Progressions are a remediation process that allows the University of Phoenix an opportunity to provide identified students with a streamlined, templated coaching process. Specifically, Academic Progression referrals apply to students in the following circumstances:

  • Non-passing grade in a B or better course
  • Unsuccessful attempt at the Dispositions Assessment
  • Non-passing score in a Guided Clinical Experience (GCE) evaluation
  • Unsatisfactory MyTimeLog (MTL) submissions of clinical (field) experience hours and reflections

The Academic Progression process encourages self-reflection through guided questions and offers specified remediation resources that students complete independently.

While the Supplemental Standards process remains in place for students with dispositional concerns or egregious behaviors, the goal of the Academic Progression process is to focus on academic concerns and to assist students in maintaining good-standing in the program.

Supplemental Standards Expectations

Note: This document complements the Supplemental Standards for Candidates in College of Education Programs.

Disposition* Description of “At Standard” Indicators
1. The candidate contributes to a positive climate in the University classroom and all field placements.Participates actively in class discussion and assignments; works effectively with others; shows respect of and consideration for the thoughts and feelings of others.
2. The candidate demonstrates mastery of written and spoken language for self-expression, as well as for effective interaction in all settings.Communicates effectively verbally; demonstrates an ability to write in a clear, organized, fluent manner; adheres to the conventions of the language when appropriate; recognizes distinctions between formal and informal communication.
3. The candidate is a thoughtful and responsive listener.Solicits feedback that demonstrates an understanding of program and professional goals and objectives; receives feedback in a positive manner and makes necessary adjustments; listens and responds to others.
4. The candidate is committed to reflection, assessment, and learning as an ongoing process and believes all students can learn.Reflects on information provided and demonstrates an ability to apply ideas to his/her own practice or life; able to modify behavior and/or understanding when provided with new information or experience; demonstrates an interest in and commitment to lifelong learning with the belief that all students can learn.
5. The candidate is willing to give and receive help.Volunteers to assist others in the University classroom and/or practicum setting; demonstrates openness to assistance from others. Accepts direction from others and respects authority.
6. The candidate is sensitive to community and cultural norms of the teacher education program, the University classroom, and practicum settings.Uses language that demonstrates sensitivity to others; communicates effectively with peers, instructors, K-12 students, and cooperating teachers; shows an awareness of the context in which s/he is interacting.
7. The candidate appreciates and values human diversity and shows respect and fairness for others’ varied talents and perspectives.Listens to others’ perspectives in a respectful and fair manner; exhibits an understanding of the complexities of race, power, gender, class, sexual orientation. and privilege in American society.
8. The candidate values the development of critical thinking, independent problem solving, and performance capabilities in himself or herself and those with whom he/she interacts.Demonstrates an ability to identify, analyze, and evaluate complex issues; exhibits the ability to solve problems both independently and in cooperation with others; sets and achieves high standards.
9. The candidate demonstrates a commitment to keeping abreast of new ideas and understanding in the education field.Identifies and analyzes important trends in education; looks for opportunities to integrate theory and practice; demonstrates enthusiasm for learning new ideas and strategies; relates class discussions and issues to current events in education.
10. The candidate demonstrates a level of responsibility and ethical judgment appropriate for a professional educator/administrator.Attends all classes, practicum experiences, and required activities and arrives on time; dresses for practicum/clinical experiences in an appropriate manner; communicates in a professional manner regarding extenuating circumstances that may prevent attendance; comes to class prepared. Candidates maintain the confidentiality of communications to which they are privy through their interactions with agencies, staff, and other health professionals.
11. The candidate maintains the highest ethical standards in interactions with faculty, students, and staff, as well as in preparation and submission of required course work, and the completion of assignments.Does not represent the work of others as his/her own; is truthful when making statements about qualifications and competencies; observes contractual commitments and timelines; protects students‘ and families’ rights to privacy and confidentiality; establishes relationships with students, parents co-workers based on courtesy, mutual trust and open communication; respects the uniqueness and characteristics of family backgrounds; acts within the educational and wider community in a way which enhances the status of the profession; promotes the improvement of school/institutional policies; develops an understanding and respect for laws and policies that protect students, parents, families, and communities.
12. The candidate maintains a pattern of exceeding minimal requirements in course and field placements.Attends all required activities and arrives on time; dresses for student teaching and field experiences in a professional manner; communicates professionally to staff, students and families; comes to class prepared; engages students in a variety of learning experiences; respects diversity; volunteers to take on additional responsibilities, as appropriate; participates in professional development opportunities offered in the school setting; maintains privacy and confidentiality.

*Note: The first nine dispositions were adapted from the standards of the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC), formerly available at the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) , http://www.ccsso.org.

Academic Catalog

The University is committed to providing an educational learning environment that is free from discrimination. The University’s Academic Catalog provides details on Students Rights and Responsibilities including but not limited to policies and information on Equal Opportunity, Harassment, Nondiscrimination, Supplemental Standards, and dispute Resolution Policy and Procedures, and program admissions requirements.

Signature Assignments

Signature Assignments are benchmark assessments designed to measure academic performance on critical concepts. The included matrixes identify the Signature Assignments required in each program. They are aligned to program student learning outcomes and California Teacher Performance Expectations and provide critical information to help the university ensure students have mastered learning outcomes necessary to be effective practitioners and to assist in the university’s programmatic assessment process. Students  use the knowledge and skills learned throughout the program to complete these assignments. Signature Assignments are required and cannot be changed or deleted.

Signature Assignments are required and cannot be changed or deleted.

Clinical (Field) Experience

Clinical (Field) Experience is an important part of any educator preparation program. Clinical (field) experiences provide teacher candidates opportunities to apply concepts learned from coursework, as they observe, assist, teach mini-lessons, and gain feedback from effective host teachers.

During clinical (field) experiences, candidates’ must be placed in classroom settings where they interact (e.g. observe, tutor, teach small groups and whole class mini-lessons) with a wide range of learners. Such experiences develop candidates’ mastery of the TPEs and prepare them to effectively teach in environments where “students may exhibit a wide range of learning and behavioral characteristics, as well as disabilities, dyslexia, intellectual or academic advancement, and differences based on ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, language, religion, and/or geographic origin. The range of students in California public schools also includes students whose first language is English, English learners, and Standard English learners” (California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, 2016).

Requirements and Expectations

Many courses in the BSLS, MAED/TED-E, and MAED/TED-S programs require clinical (field) experience commitments in public school classrooms; “school setting must reflect the full diversity of California public schools” (California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, 2017). Even though the amount of time to accomplish each assignment is not specified, the end of your program requires an accumulation of 100 hours.  Candidates may spend no more than 25-30 hours in the same classroom or with the same teacher.

The assigned clinical (field) experience required in your coursework will account for about one-third of the required field experience hours needed for your program. Consult with your instructor and course syllabus for complete assignment details. These course-related field experience assignments are not optional. Candidates must complete them as a requirement of their program. See Alternative Settings for more information.

The following matrices will help you identify courses in your program that require a field experience activity.

All clinical (field) experience placements are made by College of Education staff (state requirement). Schools must meet specific state requirements for student diversity and inclusion, use of California content standards and frameworks, and must have qualified administrators and hosting teachers. To arrange clinical (field) experience placements, complete the Clinical (Field) Experience Request form and email the form to your assigned Education Placement Specialist (EPS) at CEP.placement@phoenix.edu. In the subject line, please include your state, IRN, and full name.

NOTE: A negative TB test and a Certificate of Clearance must be on file with your credential analyst before any clinical (field) experience placements will be approved. Additional immunizations: Requirements may vary by district, and candidates should contact the school district for a list of the immunizations required prior to clinical practice/student teaching.

Failure to secure approved clinical (field) experience placements will negatively impact a candidate’s grade in courses with clinical (field) experience assignments and checkpoint and final approval of My Time Log submissions.

Background Information

The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing’s adopted standards for teacher preparation set forth the expectations for programs to provide candidates with appropriate supervised clinical experience and clinical practice. These program standards reference “all students.” Because preliminary multiple- and single-subject credentials authorize service in California public school, “it is critical that teacher preparation candidates are prepared to meet the needs of the full range of learners” (California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, 2017).

Basic requirements for a school site to be approved for Clinical Experience (100 hours of field experience)

  • “School setting must reflect the full diversity of California public schools” (California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, 2017.)
    • Review the school’s SARC report or California School Dashboard for demographics including:
      • Race, ethnicity of the students
      • Number of students from families below the federal poverty level, number or percentage of students on scholarship, tuition assistance, or other proxy that demonstrates that the school serves students from families in lower socio-economic income ranges (ex. % of students on free and reduced lunch)
      • Languages spoken by the students, including English learners
      • The inclusiveness of the school for students with disabilities and the process for students to receive additional services, i.e. student study team and individualized education program processes
  • School site must have a fully qualified administrator who holds a California preliminary or clear administrative credential.
  • School curriculum must follow California’s adopted content standards and curriculum.
  • Classrooms must have 20+ students and must have both English learners and students with special needs (e.g. IEPs, 504 Plans, etc.) including gifted students
  • Online schools, independent study programs, and home schools are prohibited
  • Private school setting that meet the requirements of a “diverse school setting” may qualify for clinical experience. These settings must be approved in advance by UOPX site placement staff. Placed in TK-12 grade classrooms, appropriate for the credential being sought. (No adult education programs)
  • Placed in TK-12 grade classrooms, appropriate for the credential being sought. (No adult education programs)
  • Candidate must have an opportunity to work with students individually, in small groups, and whole class, when appropriate. Candidate must complete assigned course assignments with a credentialed hosting teacher
  • Candidate must complete assigned course assignments with a credentialed hosting teacher

Tips for Determining Whether a School Meets the CCTC Requirements for Clinical Experience

(100 hours of field experience)

According to the California Department of Education’s 2019-20 data report “Fingertip Facts on Education in California – CalEdFacts,” the ethnic distribution of public school students is:

EthnicityNumber of StudentsPercentage
African American not Hispanic 324,496 5.30%
American Indian or Alaska Native 30,282 0.50%
Asian 575,0679.30%
Filipino 146,5019.30%
Hispanic or Latino 3,381,19854.90%
Pacific Islander 27,195 0.40%
White not Hispanic 1,381,737 22.40%
Two or More Races Not Hispanic 243,372 3.90%
None Reported 53,153 0.90%
Total6,163,001100.00%

(Source: California Department of Education (2021). Fingertip Facts on Education in California – CalEdFacts. Retrieved from: https://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/sd/cb/ceffingertipfacts.asp )

Sample Schools that Meet the Requirements for an Approved Clinical Experience Site

These examples meet the requirement: School demographics represent the full diversity of California public schools. All of these examples represent SARC Data. Locate demographic information by visiting either California Department of Education: Find a SARC or California Department of Education Dashboard.

Chula Vista Hills ElementaryDiamond Bar High School Sequoia Elementary School, San DiegoAnderson Middle School
Racially/ethnically diverse (66.5% Hispanic or Latino)
Racially/ethnically diverse (Asian 63.3%, Hispanic or Latino 18.1%, White 8.3%)
Racially/ethnically diverse (White 17.7%, Hispanic or Latino 53.2%, Filipino 4.8%)
Racially/ethnically diverse (White 55.8%, Hispanic or Latino 25.1%, Asian 5.3%, Native American or Alaskan Native 6.5%)
High population of socioeconomically disadvantaged students (39.7%)
Serves socioeconomically disadvantaged students (19.6%)
Serves socioeconomically disadvantaged students (65.6%)
Serves socioeconomically disadvantaged students (extremely high poverty) (81.4%)
Opportunity to observe classrooms with English learners (18.8%)
Opportunity to observe classrooms with English learners (6.2%)
Opportunity to observe classrooms with English learners (23.1%)
Opportunity to observe classrooms with English learners (7.7%)
Opportunity work with students with disabilities (14.1%)
Opportunity work with students with disabilities (5.3%)
Opportunity work with students with disabilities (16.1%)
Opportunity work with students with disabilities (16.9%)

References: California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, 2021. Guidance on Clinical Practice and Supervision of Teaching Candidates. Retrieved from https://www.ctc.ca.gov/docs/default-source/…prep/…/clinical-practice-guidance.pdf)

California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, 2016. California Teaching Performance Expectations. Retrieved from https://www.ctc.ca.gov/docs/default-source/educator-prep/standards/adopted-tpes-2016.pdf

1) Prior to clinical practice (student teaching), 100 clinical (field) experience hours must be completed and documented in My Time Log. My Time Log will be reviewed at selected times during the program. Faculty will review candidates’ My Time Logs to determine if they are making adequate progress in completing their clinical (field) experience hours and to determine if clinical (field) experiences are diverse. No alternate documentation of field experience will be accepted.

2) Detailed, thorough reflections regarding each observation are an expectation of working “at standard.” Candidates must ensure that all reflections contain appropriate depth and analysis, similar to the models provided, and that they are working at a standard indicative of a graduate-level program. Faculty members will only approve reflections demonstrating depth of thought and detailed analysis and explanations of effective instructional practices.

3) ELEMENTARY (Multiple Subject): If a candidate observes a classroom for an entire day, one reflection is not sufficient. Separate reflections should be written for each major time block: morning block, mid-morning block, and afternoon block. See examples provided in the section entitled “Model Reflections” and additional tips in the section “Helpful Hints for Writing Quality Clinical Experience (My Time Log) Reflections.”

4) SECONDARY (Single Subject): If a candidate observes more than one period where the lesson taught is exactly the same (same teacher, same grade level, same content area), they may write up one reflection for all periods. The reflection must provide detailed observations and analysis regarding the effectiveness of the lesson and levels of student engagement from one group of students to the next. If different grade levels and/or content areas are observed in a single day, separate reflections must be written for each observation. See examples provided in the section entitled “Model Reflections” and additional tips in the section “Helpful Hints for Writing Quality Clinical Experience (My Time Log) Reflections.”

5) Faculty members will review candidates’ My Time Log in every course. Some reviews and feedback will be informal. Formal reviews are conducted in each reading class and a final review will be conducted as part of the clinical practice (student teaching) application process.

6) Students who are significantly behind in completing the required clinical (field) experience hours will receiving an Academic Progression referral.


My Time Log

My Time Log is a web tool for logging, reviewing, and approving clinical (field) experience hours. Entries in My Time Log serve as evidence for meeting state requirement for diverse settings.

Make sure to log your hours correctly, placing your entries under the correct template. Review the following materials to learn more about My Time Log. If you have any questions about My Time Log or clinical (field) experience, contact your Education Program Specialist at CEP.placement@phoenix.edu. In the subject line, please include your state, IRN, and full name.

Accessing and Completing My Time Log

My Time Log Guidelines

Guided Clinical Experience: My Time Log Submission

Reflection Guidelines

My Time Log Tutorial

Guided Clinical Experience (GCE)

What Is Guided Clinical Experience (GCE)?

GCE is a program requirement in our graduate-level initial teacher licensure programs.

Candidates will be evaluated on their instruction and impact on student learning three times during their program with the completion of two or three GCEs (small group, whole group, or one-on-one) depending on the program. Candidates are required to instruct at least two group sessions; they may complete two small-group sessions if they are not able to obtain permission to teach in a whole-group setting.

What Is the Student’s Role?

Candidates must work with the Center for Placement and Field Experience for placement. The Center’s goal is to facilitate or place students in four 25-hour placements throughout their program.

Each candidate will work with the clinical experience hosting teacher at the placement site to determine the appropriate lesson and time for the GCE to occur. The 25-hour placement can include the GCE component and may also include traditional clinical experience hours and activities.

For each GCE assignment, the candidate will complete and submit the following:

  1. To the course faculty member, as part of the assignment requirements:
    • Guided Clinical Experience Worksheet
    • edTPA® Lesson Plan Template
  2. To the Clinical Experience Teacher, through My Time Log:
    • Guided Clinical Experience Worksheet
    • edTPA® Lesson Plan Template
    • Guided Clinical Experience Rubric

For instructions on submitting your Guided Clinical Experience in My Time Log, refer to: Guided Clinical Experience: My Time Log Submission.

All GCE documents are available under the GCE Documents tabs below. Information about the course sequence be accessed by clicking on the GCE Courses – Master of Arts in Education/Teacher Education tab below.

To download each document, click on the links below.

Program Sequences and GCE Placements for Master of Arts in Education/Teacher Education

***Courses highlighted are designated GCE courses.

MAED/TED-E 08CA

Course ID Course Title Credits LengthPrerequisites
MTE/001 Orientation to Teacher Education 01 week
MTE/510 Professional Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions 13 weeksMTE/001
MTE/516 Foundations of the Professional Educator 36 weeksMTE/001
MTE/511 Child/Adolescent Growth, Development, and Learning 36 weeksMTE/001
ELM/533 Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 36 weeksMTE/510, MTE/511, MTE/516
ELM/532 Creating an Effective Learning Environment 36 weeksMTE/510, MTE/511, MTE/516
ELL/500 Instructional Methods for English Language Learners 36 weeksELM/533
MTE/512 Teaching the Exceptional Learner 36 weeks ELM/533
RDG/556 Elements of Literacy Content and Pedagogical Knowledge 38 weeksELM/533
MTE/513 Evaluation and Data Literacy 36 weeksELM/533
ELM/536 Social Studies Content and Curricular Knowledge 36 weeksELM/533
ELM/537 Science Content and Curricular Knowledge 36 weeks ELM/533
ELM/538 Mathematics Content and Curricular Knowledge 36 weeksELM/533
ELM/539 Physical Education Content and Curricular Knowledge 24 weeksELM/533
ELM/586 Elementary Clinical Practice A 37 weeksELM/532, ELL/500, MTE/512, RDG/556, MTE/513, ELM/536, ELM/537, ELM/538, ELM/539
ELM/587 Elementary Clinical Practice B 37 weeksELM/586
Program Requirements: 42 Credits

MAED/TED–S 08CA

Course ID Course Title Credits LengthPrerequisites
MTE/001 Orientation to Teacher Education 01 week
MTE/510 Professional Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions 13 weeksMTE/001
MTE/516 Foundations of the Professional Educator 36 weeksMTE/001
MTE/511 Child/Adolescent Growth, Development, and Learning 36 weeksMTE/001
SEC/533 Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 36 weeksMTE/510, MTE/511, MTE/516
SEC/532 Secondary–Creating an Effective Learning Environment 36 weeksMTE/510, MTE/511, MTE/516
ELL/501 Instructional Methods for English Language Learners 36 weeksSEC/533
MTE/512 Teaching the Exceptional Learner 36 weeks SEC/533
RDG/558 Language Acquisition and Development 36 weeksSEC/533
MTE/513 Evaluation and Data Literacy 36 weeksSEC/533
Elective Content Area Specific Course SEC/535: English/Language Arts Content and Curricular Knowledge
SEC/536: Social Studies Content and Curricular Knowledge
SEC/538: Mathematics Content and Curricular Knowledge
SEC/539: Physical Education Content and Curricular Knowledge
SEC/540: Science Content and Curricular Knowledge
SEC/541: Visual Arts Content and Curricular Knowledge
36 weeksSEC/533
MTE/517 Technology Integration for Educators 36 weeks SEC/533
SEC/586 Secondary Clinical Practice A 37 weeksSEC/532, ELL/501, MTE/512, RDG/558, MTE/513, MTE/517
SEC/587 Secondary Clinical Practice B 37 weeksSEC/586
Program Requirements: 37 Credits

Program Sequences and Guided Field Experience Placements for Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies

***Courses highlighted are designated GFE courses.

Course ID Course Title Credits LengthPrerequisites
GEN/201 Foundations for University Success 35 weeks
EDU/300CA Orientation to Teacher Education 01 week
EDU/301CA Foundations of Education 35 weeksCompletion of all general education requirements
EDU/305CA Child Development 35 weeksEDU/301CA
EDU/311CA Models and Theories of Instruction 35 weeksEDU/305CA, EDU/301CA
RDG/420CA Elementary Methods: Reading and Language Arts 35 weeksEDU/301CA
ELL/300 Instruction and Assessment of English Language Learners 35 weeksEDU/301CA

SPE/300CA Orientation to the Exceptional Child 35 weeksEDU/301CA
EDU/321CA Classroom Management 35 weeksEDU/301CA
TPA/100 TPA Planning and Instruction 13 weeks ELL/300 , SPE/300CA
EED/436CA Elementary Methods: Social Science and Fine Arts 35 weeksEDU/301CA
EED/438CA Elementary Methods: Mathematics and Science 35 weeksEDU/301CA

TPA/200 TPA Instruction and Assessment 13 weeksTPA/100 , EDU/311CA
EED/491CA Elementary Clinical Practice A 47 weeksAll previous coursework
EED/492CA Elementary Clinical Practice B 47 weeksEED/491CA
Program Requirements: 42 Credits

What Is the Clinical Experience Hosting Teacher’s Role?

The Clinical Experience Teacher will work with the candidate to determine the appropriate lesson and time for the GCE to occur.

The Clinical Experience Teacher will assist the candidate as necessary to support the three components of GCE:

  • Pre-assessment
  • Instruction
  • Post-assessment and reflection

What Is the Faculty Member’s Role?

Faculty members will evaluate the candidate’s GCE assignment based on the completion of the assignment requirements and will provide candidates with coaching to improve their practice.

What Constitutes Meeting the GCE Program Requirements?

As part of their review of applications for the placement of candidates for student teaching, the Center for Placement and Field Experience will ensure at least two of the three required GCEs are completed. Candidates must complete all three GCEs prior to commencing their clinical practice (student teaching).

The GCE is evaluated on a four-point rubric. To meet the program requirement, candidates need a cumulative average of at least a three on all GCEs. Candidates who do not meet this minimum requirement will be provided with remediation activities to help them better prepare for their clinical practice experience.

Professional Educator

An abundance of knowledge can be gathered by hands-on experience through participation in K-12 classroom activities. Follow the guidelines listed here, as you conduct each  clinical (field) experiences to optimize your learning experience and maximize your educator knowledge base.

These considerations will assist you in representing both yourself and the university well, reflecting the professional educator disposition. Consider these classroom visits to be  a long-tern interview for a future teaching opportunity.

Remember to be professional. Your relationships with all school staff (principals, secretaries, teachers, etc.) and students are important in your future career as an educator. Communicate clearly. Dress appropriately. Be courteous and respectful to the principals and teachers who are graciously allowing you into their classrooms. Remember, you are a guest in the school, and it is a privilege, not a right, to have access to their campus, faculty, and students. Review Professional Expectations for further information.

Below is a chart representing common standards for appropriate professional attire. As you prepare for your clinical experience and/or clinical practice, please review the “Dos” and “Don’ts” of professional attire listed below. Please consider there may be exceptions to the attire listed in this chart in an educational setting. For example, you may find that a suit is only appropriate during an interview or that tennis shoes are allowed on your school’s campus. Please be sure to review the school site’s expectations for professional attire (which may be listed in an employee handbook) and, when in doubt, always error on the side of more professional dress.

DoDon'tDepends on setting – verify with supervisor
Khakis/Dockers/Dress Slacks, worn at waist Shorts Polo/golf shirts
Skirts, mid-thigh or longer Mini skirts Denim jeans or shorts
Capri pants, mid-calf or longer Leggings or spandex Athletic wear/sweats
Suits Denim/corduroy/leather Hats *
Button down shirts with collars or blouses, short or long sleeves Sweatshirts/hoodies Sneakers/tennis shoes
Sweaters Crop tops/midriff exposed/spaghetti straps/tank tops
Dress shoes or dress sandals Flip flops, tennis shoes/sneakers
Clothing with holes, frayed ends
Exposed undergarments (bra straps, boxers), fishnet stockings

* Head coverings for religious purposes are acceptable in any setting.

  • Once you have identified the school site to conduct your field experience and have received approval from the appropriate school authority, contact the hosting teacher to develop a schedule to complete the field experience. Be sure to emphasize that you would prefer to participate in the class during instructional time.
  • Call ahead if you cannot arrive at your scheduled time.
  • Reschedule if your clinical (field experience occurs during lunch, recess, a planned field trip, or other events).
  • Bring note-taking tools with you to the field experience, such as: notebook, clipboard, pen, pencil, tablet.
  • Write down any questions you would like to ask the cooperating teacher, if time permits.
  • Talk with the teacher before class to identify the expected learning outcomes and plan how you can be involved in the classroom activity.
  • Some field experience activities only require (or permit) you to observe. Think of these field experience observations as “active observation.” It means active listening, professional engagement with the teacher, and critical thinking. It is the opportunity for applying theory you have learned in your coursework to real-life practice.
  • Review Observation Techniques for more information.

Observation Techniques

Before you begin the observation, find a location to sit where you are inconspicuous and will not cause any distractions.

  • Classroom experiences should be fact-based and unbiased. Your value judgments should not enter the classroom.
  • Learn from the teachers to whom you are assigned; you will see instructional techniques that you will want to replicate and you will see others that you will not want to model. The time that you spend with teachers, students, and classrooms will be invaluable to you as you begin your teaching career.
  • Review Observation Techniques for more information.

Be aware of teachable moments – times when the activity you are participating in doesn’t go quite as planned. Teachers are experts at “seizing the moment.” Make notes to determine if you can identify when the teacher seized a teachable moment and when he/she ignored such opportunities. You will learn a great deal by asking a teacher why certain things occur or do not occur in their classroom.

As you take notes during the field experience, be thorough by noting specific details regarding classroom occurrences (e.g., instructional techniques, student responses, etc.), as well as the following basic information:

  • Your name
  • Date of the classroom field experience
  • The name of the school where the field experience occurred
  • The grade level of the students
  • The number of students, teachers, and other adults present during the field experience
  • Notice the entire school first:
    • Location, building age, maintenance, parking, yard, and so on
    • Pay attention to how you are welcomed to the office; sign in as a guest.

The Classroom Environment 

When observing in a teacher’s classroom, be alert and aware of the dynamics of the classroom.

General Information

  • Grade
  • Number of children
  • Teacher and teacher’s aide, if there is one
  • Time and date of visit (include length of visit)
    • How is the classroom set up?
    • How are the children’s desks arranged?
    • Where is the teacher’s desk located in the classroom?
    • Are bulletin boards, interest centers, and children’s work displayed?
    • Consider the lighting, ventilation, and safety (no blocked doorways, for example). Is the room neat?
    • Are there working computers?
    • Are the computers turned on? Are they being used?
  • Notice the attire.
  • Pay attention to the rapport with children.
  • Take note of the lesson delivery, such as techniques and strategies used.
  • Observe the classroom management style.
  • Can you determine the instructional objectives for the lesson? Is a lesson plan being used?

The Lesson Detail

  • Can you identify the standard or standards being addressed?
  • Does the lesson flow smoothly, or is it interrupted?
  • How are children reacting to and receiving the instruction? Do some students appear to be lost? Are some students inattentive? Is there discussion? Are questions being answered? Is higher-order thinking occurring?
  • Is the discussion including many children, or just a few? Are only the same ones participating?
  • Are children given times to complete their work? What is the teacher doing while the students complete their work? Are students provided with guided practice?
  • What are the obvious behaviors of the children? Are some having trouble? What do the ones who finish early do?
  • Is there an assessment at the end of the period? Is there closure to the lesson?
  • How was the content delivered?
  • If children are conducting research, are there adequate materials? Are children writing in their own words? What is the teacher doing?
  • What did you like about the observation? Why?
  • What would you do differently? Why?
  • Ask the teacher questions about what you observed, if time permits.
  • Follow up with a thank-you note to the teacher you observed.
  • Enter the details of your field experience session into My Time Log as soon as possible.

Summer Planning: Alternative Settings

Plan ahead to complete clinical (field) experience ahead of schedule for all courses occurring during the summer months.

Summer Field Experience

Summer can be a challenging time for teacher candidates to locate appropriate sites for completing field experiences. The most ideal environment for teacher candidates to complete field experience is in a classroom setting under the supervision of a certified teacher, so the first choice for summer placements would be at schools and districts that have year-round or modified school-year schedules. Another option would be schools or districts that offer summer school programs for high-risk or underprivileged students. To gain a wider exposure to a variety of teachers, methods, and student groups, teacher candidates should not have more than 25 hours of field experiences in the same classroom or with the same teacher.

If a school environment is not available to teacher candidates during the summer months, other acceptable field experiences may be available in the community. Alternative field experience opportunities should be instructor-led educational events for K-12 students. Examples may include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Math or science camps (these often are sponsored by local school districts, colleges, or universities)
  • Educational programs at science centers, museums, or zoos

Up to 10 hours of field experience can also be logged by taking part in suggested activities which include:

  • Attending parent/teacher organization meetings (excluding their own child’s school), school board meetings, grade level and content area meetings, all-school staff meetings and training
  • Workshops and conferences for educators (Teacher candidates can check with local school districts, the state department of education, local colleges and universities, and professional organizations for schedules of events.)

As a reminder, substitute teaching does not count towards the required 100 hours.

Please Note:
Although you can complete the assignment objectives through an alternative observation, the original field experience assignment in a formal classroom setting must still be fulfilled and documented in My Time Log at a later time. You will not be eligible for student teaching until they are complete.

Plan ahead to complete clinical (field) experience ahead of schedule for all courses occurring during the summer months.

Model Reflections

As a future educator, it is important to develop your skills as a reflective teacher. Your clinical (field) experience placements provide an opportunity to build these skills. Make sure that you are attentive during your observations and that you provide adequate details about your experiences, perceptions, and insights in your clinical (field) experience reflections.

As you consider these reflections, keep the following in mind:

  • Provide specific examples
  • Think through what you saw, heard, felt, etc.
  • There is ALWAYS something that can be improved; there is always at least one child that wasn’t engaged in the lesson
  • Detail how you would change your approach to reach these unengaged students

Below are links to examples of thoughtful clinical (field) experience reflections. These models demonstrate the quality of work expected and the level of detail and depth of analysis required in each reflection. Additionally, your clinical (field) experience reflections should show growth over time as you progress through the program.

Model Clinical (Field) Experience Reflections:

Elementary Example

Secondary Example

Helpful Hints for Writing Quality Clinical Experience (My Time Log) Reflections

Clinical experiences provide teacher candidates opportunities to view the entire scope of teaching and learning in actual classroom settings and to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective, reflective practitioners. Under the guidance of a credentialed host teacher, candidates learn about K-12 students; observe host teachers modeling effective instructional practices; gain experience in working with individual students and small groups of students; experience planning, teaching, and assessing activities; develop an awareness of practices that create a positive learning environment; develop an awareness of the total school environment; and, reflect on the experience and how it will make them an effective teacher. Use the following tips to guide My Time Log reflections on your clinical experience.

Helpful Hints for My Time Log

Clinical Practice (Student Teaching)

Clinical Practice (student teaching) is an essential component of the teacher preparation program, providing candidates an opportunity to bring theory and practice together in a classroom environment. Teacher candidates work with cooperating teachers from a school site, a University of Phoenix Practicum Faculty Supervisor, and a student teaching seminar instructor. Throughout the practicum, candidates work within a gradual release of responsibility model. Following this model, candidates incrementally increase their instructional role in the classroom, including a minimum four weeks of solo teaching. The gradual release structure encourages candidates to experiment with ideas learned in university coursework and to build their repertoire of effective instructional practices.

The College of Education is committed to preparing teacher candidates to improve student learning and meet the diverse needs of K-12 students in California public schools. Each member of the candidate’s clinical practice team contributes to the student teaching experience; each has responsibilities to the other members of the team, to the children in the classroom, and to the teaching profession. Clinical practice is a cooperative effort between school districts and the University.

Under the daily mentoring of an experienced cooperating teacher, teacher candidates engage in activities including observing effective teachers, lesson planning, co-teaching with their cooperating teacher, assisting and tutoring individual students, instructing small groups and the whole class, providing students with oral and written feedback, experimenting with various instructional strategies, analyzing student work, communicating with families, and more. Over time, candidates develop an increasing sense of ownership for teaching and learning in the placement classroom(s). Cooperating teachers guide candidates in planning and implementing curriculum, afford them many opportunities to experiment and develop their personal teaching style, encourage questions and dialogue about best practices, monitor and assess their ability to demonstrate the TPEs, and provide feedback using a strengths-based approach according to the needs of the student teacher.

Candidates are also supported by a Practicum Faculty Supervisor who conducts bi-weekly classroom observations, followed by reflective coaching and feedback sessions and who provides ongoing weekly support and feedback via email communications and phone calls. Practicum performance, along with seminar assignments, form the basis for reflective conversations during Practicum Faculty Supervisor site visits. Both the Practicum Faculty Supervisor and cooperating teacher complete informal and formal evaluations of the candidate’s performance during the clinical practice experience. Additionally, the Practicum Faculty Supervisor serves as a resource for the cooperating teacher, a liaison between the site administration and the University, and a representative of the University to the larger education community.

Concurrent with the clinical practicum, candidates enroll in student teaching seminar courses. Seminar faculty serve as another support for candidates during the practicum experience. They facilitate candidates’ continual growth of pedagogical knowledge and skills through discussions and assignments focused on the California Teaching Performance Expectation. Seminar faculty also support the development of observation, reflection, and writing skills required for the edTPA performance assessment.


The student teaching experience, therefore, is designed to present candidates with growth opportunities that enable them to develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions as an effective classroom teacher. Paramount to this development is the candidates’ ability to demonstrate competency regarding the TPEs and their understanding and application of the seven themes of professional practice that serve as the foundation of the College of Education’s Conceptual Framework. During clinical practice candidates advocate for learning, collaborate with educational communities, engage in reflective practice, integrate technology, lead through innovative practices, practice professional ethics, and value diversity. The clinical practicum is an essential component of licensure programs and it serves as a conduit for the college to fulfill its mission of “impacting student learning, one educator at a time.”

Eligibility

To be eligible for student teaching, the following requirements must be met:

Clinical Practice Policies

During Clinical Placement, teacher candidates are both a University of Phoenix student and a teacher candidate in the assigned placement school.

The candidate is a student in terms of their relationship with the cooperating teacher, Practicum Faculty Supervisor, and University of Phoenix.

  • Teacher candidates continue to be governed by the University of Phoenix Student Code of Conduct, the College of Education Supplemental Standards, and all Clinical Practice policies and procedures.
  • As a student of the cooperating teacher and Practicum Faculty Supervisor, a candidate’s growth and success depend on becoming a skilled receiver of feedback in order to drive their own learning.
    • Tips for receiving feedback: receive feedback with grace instead of defensiveness, listen to understand, ask clarifying questions, show appreciation and respect, ask for modeling and examples, reflect on the feedback, and determine next steps for professional growth.

A teacher candidate is both a guest in classrooms and school and a teacher candidate to the students, parents/caregivers, and all school personnel.

  • Candidates must adhere to California’s legal requirements for teachers.
  • While the cooperating teacher or other district personnel maintain overall accountability for a class, candidates are always expected to exercise good judgment and to conduct themselves professionally.
  • Candidates must adhere to the policies, rules, and regulations of the placement school and district including, but not limited to, reporting times; professional communication; dress and grooming; absence responsibilities and procedures (reporting absence, providing substitute teacher lesson plans, etc.); and other duties as assigned. Candidates must obtain a copy of the district’s disciplinary policy and school policies and procedures and become thoroughly familiar with them.
  • Concurrent with Clinical Practice, teacher candidates must take the appropriate seminar courses in their program of study. If a candidate chooses to postpone the student teaching experience, they must postpone enrollment in the corresponding clinical practice seminar course(s).
  • Candidates must earn a “B” or better in each seminar course. If a candidate receives less than a “B” (B- or lower, or an Incomplete), they must repeat the course AND the student teaching experience.
  • Clinical Practice can only be repeated one time. Candidates must complete a remediation process through Supplemental Standards prior to being eligible for their final attempt at clinical practice (student teaching).
  • Candidates must student teach in in either a multiple-subject or single-subject setting based on their program specialization and CSET subject exam: BSLS (Multiple Subject); MAED/TED-Elementary (Multiple Subject); MAED/TED-Secondary (Single Subject).
  • Student teachers who are removed from a student teaching placement at the request of a school district administrator or cooperating teacher, or in the event of an unapproved self-termination, will be issued a non-passing grade and must complete the remediation process. This experience counts as one of their two clinical practice attempts.
  • Candidates should complete their clinical practice twelve (12) months from the completion date of their last required course in the program. If candidates defer student teaching for more than one year, they may encounter changes in state examinations and/or other requirements for teacher certification. Candidates will be responsible for complying with any new state credentialing requirements at the time student teaching is completed.
  • Clinical Practice refers to an extended period of supervised teaching, described by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing as a “developmental and sequential set of activities.”
  • Clinical practice is a 600 hour (approximately 16-17 full-time weeks) experience in a classroom(s) appropriate to the credential begin earned.
    • Full-time = 5 fully scheduled work days each week during the same required contract hours as a teacher at the school.
    • Additionally, time beyond contract hours may be necessary to collaborate with the candidate’s cooperating teacher (before or after school according to the cooperating teacher’s preference) and to prepare classroom materials for the next day’s lessons.
    • Candidates should expect to spend an additional 2 to 3 hours outside of the school day for planning purposes

Required Length of Clinical Practice

Multiple Subject Single Subject
Two placements
One 16 to17-week placement
One 8- to 9-week primary classroom (grades TK to 2)
At least 4 periods within the content area
One 8- to 9-week upper elementary classroom (grades 3 to 6)
Two different preps (subjects or grade levels)

Required Solo Teaching Time

“Student teaching includes a minimum of four (4) weeks of solo or co-teaching or the equivalent” (Program Standard 3).

Multiple Subject Single Subject
Two weeks minimum of solo teaching for each 8- to 9-week placement
Four weeks minimum of solo teaching at the end of the placement
4 total weeks
Responsible for all class periods
Responsible for teaching all core subject areas

The goal for the entire clinical practice is perfect attendance. Should an absence be necessary, a candidate must understand and adhere to the following:

  • You are considered absent when you are not in attendance for the full contracted day.
    • Acceptable absence from student teaching include serious illness, death in the family, etc.
    • Unacceptable absence from student teaching include job interviews, weddings, travel, etc.
  • You are permitted no more than five (5) absences during student teaching.
    • All absences must be made up at the end of student teaching.
    • If a candidate is absent more than five days, the placement will be terminated and they will be required to repeat the entire student teaching experience.
  • You must notify the cooperating teacher, Practicum Faculty Supervisor, and college designee of an absence prior to the start of the school day and must submit the Student Teacher Absence Form.
  • You must supply lesson plans for a substitute teacher and/or cooperating teacher when they are absent.
  • Contact the clinical placement Education Program Specialist immediately if you cannot complete your student teaching assignment for any reason.

Teacher candidates are expected to exercise discretion in keeping all specific student and teacher/administrator information confidential. Logs, portfolio notes, assignments, and other classroom information must not contain any identifying information. If classroom student names or the names of teachers or administrators are used, they should be changed to maintain confidentiality.

Candidates will have access to certain kinds of information about students. Please consult with the cooperating teacher and/or site administrator about the rules and policies in effect, so all actions remain lawful and within the guidelines established by the district in compliance with Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

University of Phoenix teacher candidates are required to video record themselves teaching for assessment purposes. Candidates must take reasonable precautions to maintain the confidentiality and security of video recordings. Review the EdTPA Video Guidelines before pursuing any video recording.

Candidates should be aware of legal policies and procedures regarding the audio or video recording of students. Whenever audio or video recordings of students are made, parents/caregivers must sign release forms. Candidates should check with either the building principal or their cooperating teacher to obtain the appropriate school or district permission forms to use in audio/video recording of candidate’s teaching sessions, or the candidate should use the EdTPA video permission form.

The Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act designates certain persons, including teachers, as mandated reporters. The existing law requires a mandated reporter to report an issue if the person has knowledge of or observes a child whom the person knows or reasonably suspects has been the victim of child abuse or neglect.

If a student teacher suspects abuse or neglect, they should notify the cooperating teacher and/or site administrator and follow mandated reporting guidelines. For more information, visit the Mandated Reporter FAQ.

Some districts permit clinical practice teacher candidate to substitute teach, though they must first check district/school policy prior to candidate committing to subbing. Candidates can only substitute for their cooperating teacher and can only substitute for 1 or 2 days (unless the COE administrator grants permission for additional days).

Clinical practice teacher candidates only work as a substitute teacher under following conditions:

  • Site principal requests the candidate to serve as the cooperating teacher’s substitute teacher
  • Candidate holds a 30-day Substitute Teaching Permit for the school district in which they are placed
  • Candidate receives permission from the cooperating teacher and Practicum Faculty Supervisor

Note: a legal liability may occur for those Clinical Placement teacher candidates who substitute teach without the proper permit and/or university authorization.

In the event of a district labor dispute, University of Phoenix endorses a policy of non-involvement for teacher candidates. Should a work stoppage occur at the placement site, candidates should immediately report this to their Practicum Faculty Supervisor and Education Program Specialist. Candidates shall not engage in any actions accompanying a work stoppage. If the period of work stoppage extends beyond five days, re-assignment may take place.

Teacher candidates must follow school/district guidelines for the use of electronic devices at the placement site. Candidates may not use electronic devices, including cell phones, while in their assigned classroom. Should an emergency occur, first step out of the classroom (never leave students unattended and never disrupt the class when leaving), then answer the phone. Texting during classroom time is prohibited.

The candidate may use electronic devices to integrate technology in their instructional practice with the approval of the cooperating teacher and in accordance with the school/district policies. Candidates may be granted access to the cooperating teacher’s classroom computer for activities such as taking role and entering grades. Candidates must respect the cooperating teacher’s privacy and may not view personal materials and/or emails.

Teacher candidates are required to wear business casual attire at the school site, regardless of the attire worn by teachers working at the placement site. Attire should be professional, neat, clean, and in good taste. Hairstyles should be neat and clean, hats/caps should not be worn (religious head coverings are permitted). Policies regarding visual display of tattoos, facial piercings, and hair color are at the discretion of the school site.

Unacceptable:

  • Shorts or t-shirts (except designated Spirit Days)
  • Sweat pants, workout/yoga clothing (except for PE candidates)
  • Sweatshirts (except designated Spirit Days) or tank tops
  • Ripped clothing or ragged/cut-off edges
  • Pants resulting in exposure of private body parts when bending or sitting
  • Shirts/blouses/dresses with plunging necklines or see-through materials
  • Flip-flop or slippers

If a teacher candidate is removed from a placement at the request of a site administrator or cooperating teacher from the clinical practice location or University of Phoenix:

  • Candidates who are removed from a placement at the request of an appointed administrator, prior to starting and posting attendance in their first clinical practice seminar will result in the candidate being placed on Scholastic Suspension and administratively withdrawn. Scholastic Suspension will be removed upon the candidates’ successful completion of their supplemental standards remediation process. This experience counts as one of their two clinical practice attempts.Candidates may request an exemption from this policy when dealing with issues related to family crisis, medical necessity, or natural disaster. Candidates will need to work with their appointed administrator to have these exceptions approved.
  • Candidates who are removed from a placement at the request of an appointed administrator, after having met any amount of attendance in their clinical practice seminar, will be withdrawn from the clinical practice seminar, will be issued a grade of “F”, and placed on Scholastic Disqualification. This experience counts as one of their two clinical practice attempts.Candidates may request an exemption from this policy when dealing with issues related to family crisis, medical necessity, or natural disaster. Candidates will need to work with their appointed administrator to have these exceptions approved.

If a candidate decides to pursue an unapproved self-terminations of a clinical practice:

  • Candidates that execute an unapproved self-termination of clinical practice, prior to starting and posting attendance in their first clinical practice seminar will result in the candidate being placed on Scholastic Suspension and administratively withdrawn. Scholastic Suspension will be removed upon the candidates’ successful completion of their supplemental standards remediation process. This experience counts as one of their two clinical practice attempts. Candidates that execute an unapproved self-termination of clinical practice, prior to starting and posting attendance in their first clinical practice seminar will result in the candidate being placed on Scholastic Suspension and administratively withdrawn. Scholastic Suspension will be removed upon the candidates’ successful completion of their supplemental standards remediation process. This experience counts as one of their two clinical practice attempts.Candidates may request an exemption from this policy when dealing with issues related to family crisis, medical necessity, or natural disaster. Candidates will need to work with their appointed administrator to have these exceptions approved.
  • Candidates that execute an unapproved self-termination of a clinical practice, after having met any amount of attendance in their clinical practice seminar, will be withdrawn from the clinical practice seminar, will be issued a grade of “F”, and will be placed on Scholastic Disqualification. This experience counts as one of their two clinical practice attempts.Candidates may request an exemption from this policy when dealing with issues related to family crisis, medical necessity, or natural disaster. Candidates will need to work with their appointed administrator to have these exceptions approved.

Note: Candidates that fail their first attempt of a clinical practice must repeat all of the clinical practice and any incomplete seminar coursework. Candidates that previously completed a successful attempt of the corresponding clinical practice seminar will not be required to retake the course and will instead be partnered with a designated staff member from the College of Education to ensure that they are successfully progressing and prepared for their next clinical practice seminar.


Responsibilities

Clinical practice allows candidates to bring theory and practice together in a classroom environment. Following a supervised gradual release of responsibilities model, candidates are encouraged to:

  • Experiment with ideas learned in university coursework
  • Build their repertoire of effective instructional practices
  • Co-plan and independently plan standards-based lessons where candidates add their own ideas and creative solutions to designing lesson plans
  • Reflect on their effectiveness at positively impacting all students to reach learning targets

To prepare for the clinical placement, the cooperating teacher, Practicum Faculty Supervisor, and teacher candidate must:

  • Attend the required Clinical Practice Orientation Training which is conducted by the Practicum Faculty Supervisor prior to or during the first week of the placement at the school site.
  • During the Clinical Practice Orientation Training, the team must verify the appropriateness of the placement setting using the Clinical Practice Setting Checklist.

Attend Mandatory Clinical Practice Orientation Training: Meeting Conducted by Practicum Faculty Supervisor

The Clinical Practice Orientation Training introduces the cooperating teacher and candidate to University of Phoenix policies, procedures, and expectations for the student teaching experience, establishes each member’s role and responsibilities, and ensures that all involved are set up for success. This orientation also provides an opportunity to establish clear expectations for consistent weekly communication between all members.

Clinical Practice Orientation Training is held prior to or during the first week of the placement. This face-to-face training occurs at the school site with all members of the team present and is conducted by the Practicum Faculty Supervisor. The training is approximately one hour long.

Note: This Clinical Practice Orientation Training is part of the cooperating teacher’s state required 10 hours of training.

Practicum Faculty Supervisors are required to use the following materials for this training: Clinical Practice Orientation Training PowerPoint, Student Teaching Manual, and Clinical Practice Orientation Checklist.

Verify Appropriateness of Placement Setting

The Practicum Faculty Supervisor, in collaboration with the cooperating teacher, candidate, and University of Phoenix staff, must verify that the clinical practice placement allows for all of the following. Should items arise that do not meet these requirements, immediately contact the Educational Specialist and/or Program Chair, as a new setting may be necessary.

Practice Clinical Setting Checklist:

  • Ensures a teaching/learning climate that allows the student teacher to develop skills in instructional planning and provides numerous opportunities for them to test theory and practice in the classroom.
  • Provides a teaching/learning atmosphere that supports dialogue and discussion, provides strengths-based feedback and next steps for growth, and encourages open communication promoting the student teacher’s self-reflection and professional growth.
  • Allows time in the daily schedule for the cooperating teacher and candidate to collaborate, co-plan lessons and discuss curricular requirements, and engage in coaching and feedback conversations focused on the candidate’s progress toward meeting the TPEs.
  • Uses curricular materials based on California content standards and allows the candidate flexibility and creativity in the use of these curricular materials and in the instructional delivery of content.
    • Note: The expectation is for the cooperating teacher to provide appropriate curricular materials. Candidates come with a wide range of experiences and skills. Most do not yet have the background to develop curriculum from scratch.
  • Allows the candidate to fulfill state requirements for solo teaching.
    • Multiple Subject Candidates: Complete a minimum of two (2) weeks of full-time solo teaching in each placement.
    • Single Subject Candidates: Complete minimum of four (4) weeks of full-time solo teaching.
  • Allows the candidate to complete edTPA requirements and tasks, including video taping of lessons and obtaining necessary student background information needed to describe the context of the learning situation. Student work samples are required to be submitted.
    • Note: edTPA requires multiple video tape segments of the candidate teaching students in the placement classroom.
  • Placement setting has at least one English language learner and one student with special needs (IEP, 504 Plan, gifted student, etc.) to serve as “focus students” for edTPA tasks.

Over the clinical practice placement, candidates gradually expand their teaching responsibility, as cooperating teachers release responsibility to the student teacher. Since candidates enter the clinical practice phase of the program with varying skill levels and experiences, there is no prescribed timeline for this process. Instead, the clinical practice team (candidate, cooperating teacher, and Practicum Faculty Supervisor) collaborates to create a “step up” of responsibilities plan that best supports the candidate’s growth and development by building on strengths and adding new responsibilities over time. This progression plan must also consider the needs of students in the TK-12 placement classroom.

The Commission on Teacher Credentialing requires teacher candidates to complete a minimum of four (4) weeks of full-time solo teaching during clinical practice. For multiple-subject candidates, a minimum of two weeks of solo teaching must occur in each placement.

The following chart shows a suggested plan for the gradual assuming of responsibilities by the candidate. The schedule may be modified to fit the unique needs of the candidate, cooperating teacher, students, or school. Candidates advance from phase to phase when the clinical practice team decides the candidate is ready. The guidelines assume self-reflection is an ongoing part of the candidate’s work and drives the focus of coaching conversations between members of the team.

Following the gradual releasing/assuming of responsibility philosophy, the cooperating teacher and candidate work as co-teachers. Co-planning and co-teaching are effective ways to model and experience sound instructional practices and better guarantee a quality experience for all.


Six Phases of Gradual Releasing/Assuming of Responsibility:

Become acquainted with the school (personnel, school climate, student/teacher expectations), classroom (procedures and routines, behavior expectations, etc.), and students (names, personality traits, interests, learning styles).

Observe the cooperating teacher model effective instructional practices and classroom management strategies. Notice the cycle of planning, instruction, assessment, and reflecting.

Assist the cooperating teacher by tutoring individuals and small groups; helping with managerial tasks such as taking role, preparing, and distributing learning materials; checking homework and reviewing/assessing student work, etc.

Collaboration Focus Suggestions:Review classroom curriculum guides and learning standards, classroom routines and procedures, etc. Learn about student accommodations. Cooperating teacher uses “think aloud” to model lesson planning process, instructional decisions, classroom management, course of action for student issues, and self-reflection habits/skills. Review the TPEs.

edTPA: Planning & Implementing edTPA Learning Segments

Plan ahead to complete edTPA requirements early in the clinical placement.

  • Review edTPA requirements and tasks, and develop a timeline for completion.
    • Typical timeframe
      • 3-4 weeks to plan for teaching the lesson segment
      • 2-3 weeks to teach lesson segment (3-5 connected/consecutive lessons)
      • 2-4 weeks to compile materials, watch and analyze videos, analyze student work, and write and revise commentary
  • Two things candidates must know prior to planning the lesson segment:
    • What students are you teaching (class/period)?
    • What content will be the focus of the planned lesson segment?
    • Note: The lesson segment can be taught during the co-teaching or solo teaching phase of the clinical placement.
  • Planning the lesson segment:
    • Candidate and cooperating teacher collaborate on selection of learners, selection of central focus, instructional approaches for the lesson segment, how to support specific students with learning needs, and discuss students’ prior learning and how to align assessments with the central focus.
    • The cooperating teacher should provide context and background about the students, so the candidate can plan instruction based on their specific strengths and needs.
    • Cooperating teacher can offer examples, ideas, suggestions and resources for the lesson segment, as well as pose probing questions to clarify the candidate’s thinking and intentions. When the candidate asks for specific feedback on their work, the cooperating teacher can prompt them to provide a rationale for instructional decisions with the goal being to help the candidate find their own answers.
  • Details about acceptable and unacceptable support are found in this resource:

(Phase 1 activities continue)

Co-Planning: Brainstorm ideas for lessons, lesson pacing, scaffolding learning for complex concepts, differentiating learning to meet the needs of all learners, self-reflecting, and methods to make learning visible to students and teacher via formative assessments/progress monitoring. Co-develop parent/caregiver communications regarding students’ progress.

Co-Teaching: Based on the cooperating teacher’s lesson plans, the candidate begins to team teach small portions of lessons. Examples of activities include the candidate: greeting students and conducting opening activities; providing directions for an activity; teaching mini-lesson at a rotation table; conducting daily closure activities and preparing students for dismissal; preparing learning centers for current instructional unit; etc. Candidate assumes classroom management responsibilities while instructing. Candidate also shadows/assists cooperating teacher in supervisory activities – recess or class supervision, attendance, bus duty, etc.

Cooperating teacher continues to model effective instructional practices, building the candidate’s repertoire of instructional skills and providing daily feedback to the candidate for support and growth. Candidate focuses on classroom management, mastery of content, lesson pacing, and “teacher presence.”

Collaboration Focus Suggestions:
Cooperating teacher uses “think aloud” strategy to model lesson planning process, instructional decisions, classroom management, course of action for student issues, and self-refection habits/skills. Discuss how teachers look at and use student work, how and why they provide students feedback, and how they help students to link feedback to future learning. Begin dialogues around the essential question: “what evidence shows that students were actively engaged and successful in meeting the learning targets?”

Candidate and cooperating teacher should select specific TPEs for focused attention and goal setting.

(Phase 2 activities continue)

Co-Teaching & Co-Planning Continue: Together, candidate and cooperating teacher co-plan and co-teach throughout the day with the student teacher gradually taking more responsibility for planning and teaching whole group lessons, small group lessons, supplemental teaching, and station teaching. The cooperating teacher models specific instructional strategies during one lesson, or portion of a lesson, and then the candidate emulates the strategy in another lesson.

Transitioning to Independent Teaching: As the candidate grows in confidence and ability, they begin independently planning and teaching a short series of lessons, in consultation with the cooperating teacher.

Independent Teaching: Transitioning to full-time teaching is a gradual process for the candidate. First, the candidate plans for and teaches one subject, most often with the cooperating teacher asking guiding questions during the planning process. The candidate begins to take over the planning and teaching of additional subjects and/or classes each week, as they demonstrate competency. The cooperating teacher continues to provide curricular materials as the basis of units and lessons designed. The candidate experiments with a wide variety of instructional practices such as partner work, cooperative learning structures, rotating stations, inquiry learning, 100% participation techniques, progress monitoring techniques, etc.

As the candidate assumes responsibility for teaching subjects/classes, they also assume responsibility for assessing and grading student work and developing instructional materials needed to enhance lessons and actively engage students in learning.

  • 4 weeks minimum for single subject candidates
  • 2 weeks minimum for multiple subject candidates in each setting

The goal of solo teaching is for the candidate to demonstrate readiness to lead a classroom. During this phase, the candidate assumes full responsibility for the classroom and its instructional program under the guidance of the cooperating teacher. The candidate experiences and practices long-range planning. The cooperating teacher’s primary responsibilities during this phase are guidance, feedback, and evaluation.

During solo teaching the candidate is responsible for: planning lessons for every subject/class and having the plans reviewed by the cooperating teacher the Friday before each week’s instruction; teaching all subjects and/or classes; using appropriate, varied, and creative instructional strategies; attending to all classroom management issues; assuming responsibility for all communication between home and school; etc.

Cooperating teacher and candidate develop an appropriate way for the candidate to transfer responsibility of teaching back to the cooperating teacher. This transfer period is important because it allows the students to adjust to the changes in their classroom.


Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs)

The Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) comprise the body of knowledge, skills, and abilities that beginning general education teachers have the opportunity to learn in approved teacher preparation programs in California” (Commission on Teacher Credentialing, 2016). They determine what candidates need to know and be able to do upon completion of an accredited credentialing program.

Clinical practice allows candidates to practice and master the knowledge and skills described in the TPEs. Coaching conversations should focus on specific elements of the California Teaching Performance Expectations, guiding the candidate’s growth and development in each area. The TPEs are the foundation of UOPX evaluation of teacher candidates.

  • TPE 1: Engaging and Supporting All Students in Learning
  • TPE 2: Creating and Maintaining Effective Environments for Student Learning
  • TPE 3: Understanding and Organizing Subject Matter for Student Learning
  • TPE 4: Planning Instruction and Designing Learning Experiences for All Students
  • TPE 5: Assessing Student Learning
  • TPE 6: Developing as a Professional Educator

Responsibilities of Team Members

By the end of the clinical practice experience, candidates are expected to assume all daily tasks completed by effective TK-12 teachers. Candidates gradually assume these teaching responsibilities. Candidates should aim to master the TPEs by the end of the clinical placement.

Teacher candidates should demonstrate professional dispositions while representing University of Phoenix at the clinical placement site. Refer to the College of Education’s Supplemental Standards and Professional Dispositions Rubric.

Clinical Practice and Seminar Assignments in order to receive full credit for the clinical practice experience, candidates must complete all assignments as required by the Practicum Faculty Supervisor and seminar instructor. These may include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Daily Lesson Plans
    • Whether co-teaching or solo teaching, candidates are required to prepare detailed lesson plans for each lesson taught during clinical placement, including mini-lessons, small group instruction, planned one-on-one tutoring, etc. Lesson plans must be standards-based and must adhere to the school/district curriculum.
    • Detailed written lesson plans set a teacher up for success. They guide instruction to maximize students’ learning time and to keep the teacher focused and organized. There are many ways to write a lesson plan. The cooperating teacher and/or Practicum Faculty Supervisor may require a specific lesson plan format, or they may encourage the candidate to experiment with a variety of lesson planning templates. Regardless of the format, effective lessons:
      • Contain planned learning targets based on state content standards and frameworks
      • Build on previously learned concepts
      • Grab and maintain students’ attention
      • Use various instructional activities to actively engage all students in learning with each other and the teacher
      • Establish real-world connections and incorporate student experiences and interests
      • Provide access to the content in a variety of ways
      • Build critical, analytical, and creative thinking skills
      • Plan various ways to check students’ understanding
      • Close lessons with students reflecting on the question, “What did we learn today?”
  • Basic Lesson Plan Requirements:
    • Formal lesson plans should be submitted to the cooperating teacher and Practicum Faculty Supervisor 24-48 hours prior to teaching the lesson. This allows them time to provide feedback and the candidate to make revisions based on their suggestions.
    • Lesson plans must align with California state content standards and frameworks and with district curricula.
    • Organize lesson plans in a notebook (or computer file) and make them available to the Practicum Faculty Supervisor and other school personnel (i.e. principal) upon request.
    • When selecting a lesson plan template, keep in mind edTPA lesson planning requirements and the components of the Effective Teaching Cycle.

Cycle of Effective Teaching

Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE). (2018). edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook (version 07) [PDF file]. Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Retrieved from:

https://multimedia.phoenix.edu/education/elementary-literacy/

Weekly Reflections and Communications with Practicum Faculty Supervisor

Teacher candidates must submit weekly reflections to TK20. The quality of these reflections and communications comprised 20% of the clinical practice grade.

Self-evaluation and reflection are essential for continuous growth toward becoming an effective teacher. Taking time to reflect and analyze in writing the successes and challenges of each lesson and the week as a whole allows candidates to discover things that might otherwise have gone unnoticed. Consider the following:

  • Reflections may be narrative commentary or bulleted ideas of three to four sentences in length.
  • Use a format/method that most effectively moves you beyond simply retelling the week’s events.
  • Student learning should be the central focus of weekly reflections. Consider: How do you know students were/were not learning? What evidence supports your thinking? How will you use these experiences to grow and develop as a teacher?

Sample Formats for Writing Weekly Reflections

Weekly Attendance Log

  • • Complete the Weekly Attendance Log, noting daily hours spent at the assigned school and any absences. Candidate and cooperating teacher must initial the log at the end of each week to verify candidate’s attendance. It is the candidate’s responsibility to keep all hand written attendance logs. The Practicum Faculty Supervisor will review the candidate’s attendance log during each site visit.
      • Multiple-subject Candidates:
        At the end of each placement, the Attendance Log is signed by the candidate, cooperating teacher, and Practicum Faculty Supervisor to verify accuracy of the information. The Practicum Faculty Supervisor submits the Attendance Log to TK20.
    • Single-subject Candidates:
      An Attendance Log is submitted twice during the placement.

      • First submission occurs after the Practicum Faculty Supervisor’s mid-term visit. The candidate, cooperating teacher, and Practicum Faculty Supervisor sign the log to verify accuracy of the information.
      • Second submission occurs at the end of the clinical placement. Again, the candidate, cooperating teacher, and Practicum Faculty Supervisor sign the log to verify accuracy of the information.

      The Practicum Faculty Supervisor submits the Attendance Log to the candidate’s TK20 file.

edTPA Capstone Performance Assessment

edTPA is a performance assessment that measures novice teachers’ readiness to teach and their mastery of the TPEs. It is designed with a focus on student learning and principles from research and theory, based on findings that successful teachers:

  • Develop knowledge of subject matter, content standards, and subject-specific pedagogy.
  • Understand students’ varied needs and apply knowledge to help all students learn
  • Consider research and theory about how students learn; and
  • Reflect on and analyze evidence of the effects of instruction on student learning.

edTPA is designed to engage candidates in demonstrating their understanding of teaching and student learning in authentic ways. Candidates submit unedited video recordings of themselves teaching children in their clinical placement classroom as part of a portfolio scored by trained assessors. While the planning and teaching of the edTPA lesson segment(s) happens in the placement classroom, guidance for writing the assessment occurs in the seminar course.

edTPA evaluates candidates in the following areas of effective instruction:

Cycle of Effective Teaching

Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE). (2018). edTPA Elementary Literacy Assessment Handbook (version 07) [PDF file]. Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Retrieved from:

https://multimedia.phoenix.edu/education/elementary-literacy/

  • Follow seminar instructor’s guidelines, timelines, and due dates for completing various edTPA assignments and tasks.
  • Candidate and cooperating teacher collaborate on selection of learners, selection of central focus (main idea you want students to learn), instructional approaches for the lesson segment (3-5 connected lessons), how to support specific students with learning needs, and discuss students’ prior learning and how to align assessments with the central focus.
  • edTPA is the capstone performance assessment of the candidate’s mastery of the TPEs.
  • All persons supporting the candidate on their edTPA must adhere to the guidelines for acceptable and unacceptable support.

edTPA Assessed Teaching Areas and Required Artifacts

Task Task Content Area Artifacts
1PlanningContext for learning
Learning segment
Instructional materials
Literacy assessments
Task1 commentary
2Instruction
Video clips
Task 2 commentary
3Assessment
Student work samples
Evidence of feedback
Video evidence of academic language (optional)
Task 3 commentary
Evaluation criteria
4Mathematics Assessment (ONLY for Elem Ed)Context for learning
Learning segment overview
Mathematics chosen formative assessment
Evaluation criteria
Student work samples from formative assessment
Student work samples from re-engagement lesson
Task 4 commentary

Clinical Practice Seminar Assignments:

  • Clinical practice seminar courses emphasize the practical application of educational theories and methods in TK-12th grade classrooms. Candidates focus on the following topics: school culture, academic language, lesson planning, and instruction. The course:
      • Provides a forum for open discussion and problem solving based on classroom experiences.
      • Emphasizes understanding and applying the California Teaching Performance Expectations.
      • Guides teacher candidates in preparing their edTPA submission.
        • Evidence of edTPA submission is a graduation requirement. Passing edTPA is a requirement for institutional recommendation and credentialing.

    Required Seminar Assignments:

        • edTPA
          Each week’s seminar work is associated with preparing elements of edTPA tasks. Students who follow seminar instructor and course guidelines will be prepared to submit their TPA by the end of the student teaching experience.
        • Individual Development Plan
          The Individual Development Plan (IDP)The Individual Development Plan (IDP) is a collaborative effort between the candidate, cooperating teacher, and Practicum Faculty Supervisor. Completion of the IDP occurs at the end of the clinical practice. (For multiple-subject candidates, the IDP is completed at the end of the second/final placement).
          The IDP describes the candidate’s strengths, along with next steps for growth and areas of interest to explore and develop during his/her induction program. The IDP is a Commission on Teacher Credentialing requirement for educator preparation programs.
          The IDP is submitted at the end of Clinical Practice Seminar B.
        • Exit Survey
          The Commission on Teacher Credentialing requires teacher preparation program completers to complete an Exit Survey. The link to this survey is found in Clinical Practice Seminar B.

General Responsibilities of the Candidate:

      • Attend the required Clinical Placement Orientation Training conducted by the Practicum Faculty Supervisor at the school site with the cooperating teacher.
      • Give top priority to the clinical placement experience. Outside employment, commuting time, child care issues, etc. should not interfere with required hours at the school site.
      • Be professional at all times. Follow all UOPX clinical placement policies. Be punctual and prepared.
      • Use the Gradual Releasing/Assuming of Responsibilities model for increasing participation in making instructional and classroom management decisions. Follow the cooperating teacher’s lead regarding co-planning and co-teaching. Complete a minimum of four weeks of solo teaching.
      • Seek suggestions and feedback from the cooperating teacher and Practicum Faculty Supervisor. Strive to develop skills needed to positively receive feedback and to take actions to implement recommended ideas and suggestions.
      • Use TPEs and the Conceptual Framework as guiding documents and standards to focus discussions with cooperating teacher and Practicum Faculty Supervisor.

    Prepare for faculty supervisor visits by:

      • Providing a lesson plan for the observation at least 48 hours in advance, so the supervisor can provide feedback prior to the visit.
      • Prior to the visit inform the Practicum Faculty Supervisor about parking policies, check-in procedures at the school office, and location of candidate’s classroom. Inform school staff of each observation day/time, so they know the supervisor is coming.
      • Set up a place in the back of the classroom for the Practicum Faculty Supervisor to sit and take notes. Often, the Practicum Faculty Supervisor will move about the room to observe and listen to students as they work.
    • Multiple-subject candidates follow their students when grade level teachers rotate students for specific content areas (ex. rotate students for social studies and science)
      • If there are content area specialists, the candidates follows the students to gain exposure to content subjects like PE, art, music, etc.

Become familiar with the school’s policies, programs, daily schedule, calendar, student services, and community.

Confer with and/or observe teaching staff involved with students’ instruction in special programs or services (English language learners, gifted education, special education, speech, occupational therapy, physical therapy, etc.).

    • Participate in the professional activities of a classroom teacher. Suggested activities include attending:
      • Grade level/department meetings or other staff related meetings
      • Professional development events and professional learning communities
      • Back-to-School Night, parent conferences, open house, and other school events
      • School board meetings

Notify UOPX staff about any concerns related to the cooperating teacher’s performance, the Practicum Faculty Supervisor’s performance, or any other issues that warrant administrative attention.

As a best practice, maintain a daily reflective journal about the clinical practice journey, as reflection is an important part of the growth process. Take time to reflect both inward and outward, thinking about the experiences and learning opportunities that occurred each day. For many candidates, journaling is a “think-through” process that leads to deeper connections between theory and practice, as well as a problem solving tool that moves one forward in his/her professional practice. The important thing is to watch and note growth over time.

    • Record anecdotal observations about individual students. Consider how they learn, what motivates their learning, what dis-engages them from learning, how the learning environment affects them, general characteristics of students at that age, etc.
      • Consider students who are an academic challenge. These students might be frequently absent, gifted learners, English language learners, students with special needs, students from socio-economically disadvantaged families, students who have experienced trauma or homelessness, etc. Consider what might be done to try to reach these students and/or to help them to be more successful.
    • Take notes about instructional strategies that positively impact student learning and those that do not. Reflect on how you positively impacting student learning, as you implement various strategies in your practice.
    • Observe and think about classroom management/environment approaches that serve to engage all students in learning and those that shut-down learning in some students. Describe what you notice, list questions that remain, and ideas you want to try.
    • Reflect on successes and challenges that occurred during lessons taught. Consider how you taught, what worked and what did not work, and how things could have been done differently to engage all students in learning.
    • Describe the various ways you know students are meeting a lesson’s learning targets. What did you see and hear that indicated students were learning?
    • Reflect on what is happening in the classroom and how you are responding to it.
    • Make note of your short and long term goal progress.
    • Select one of the six TPE domains to focus on. Reflect on the progress you are making to meet the elements of the domain including areas of success, areas that need refining, and next steps for growth.

The cooperating teacher (DES) is an integral part of student teaching. The experience and knowledge that the cooperating teacher shares with the candidate is key to their growth over time, their success in demonstrating the TPEs, and their future attitudes and beliefs about teaching and learning. The cooperating teacher is designated to oversee, model, mentor, evaluate, and provide feedback to the candidate on a daily basis.

Cooperating teachers will use evaluation instruments, standard observations, feedback, and coaching strategies to assist student teachers in developing their instructional and management skills during their time in the classroom. The University provides a stipend for professional services to the cooperating teacher.

Qualifications of the Cooperating Teacher/DES

As an accredited Teacher Preparation Program, the University of Phoenix is accountable to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) and California Ed Code. Requirements for the selection of cooperating teachers/DES are articulated in the CTC document “Guidance on Clinical Practice and Supervision of Preliminary Multiple and Single Subject Teaching Candidates.” Qualified cooperating teachers must:

  • Hold a Clear Credential (multiple- or single-subject) in the content area for which they are providing supervision
  • Have a minimum of 5 years of teaching experience in TK-12 public school classrooms
  • Master’s degree preferred
  • Recognized expertise in subject matter knowledge, demonstrated exemplary teaching practices, effective classroom management skills, and excellent human relations skills as determined by the employer and the preparation program

Completion of State Required 10 hours of CT Training

  • The cooperating teacher must complete a minimum of ten (10) hours of state required training.
    • Two hours of UOPX trainings, one of which is the face-to-face Orientation Training Meeting conducted by the Practicum Faculty Supervisor to review program expectations. The second hour is a self-paced recorded UOPX webinar titled, “Feedback by Design: Engaging Student Teachers for Growth and Success.
    • Eight hours of training about effective supervision including Coaching Adult Learners, Instructional strategies for all learners, and Inclusive education. The University Education Program Specialist will send out an invite via email to the Cooperating Teacher from the Course Networking website prior to the student teacher’s official start date. Please be on the lookout for a detailed email outlining the information regarding the 10 hours of training.
      • Note: The eight hour training is a one-time state requirement. While we encourage all cooperating teachers to complete the training, one can provide evidence of past training and expertise in specific areas and can “waive” training modules.

General Responsibilities of the Cooperating Teacher

  • Participate in the Clinical Practice Orientation Training prior to or during the first week of the clinical placement.
  • Collaborate with candidate to decide upon daily/weekly times to co-plan and debrief lessons.
  • Orient candidate to the school setting and its culture, colleagues, curriculum materials, polices, assessment/background information about students, and to specialist and resources available to students, families, and teachers.
  • Share classroom procedures, routines, and policies. Introduce curricular resources, including technology used for teaching and learning.
  • Model effective pedagogy for the respective content area(s). Make thinking regarding instructional decisions transparent for the candidate.
  • Co-plan and co-teach with the candidate as they develop knowledge and skills described in the TPEs.
  • Guide and support the student teacher in gradually assuming responsibilities for making instructional and classroom management decisions.
  • Provide informal daily feedback to the candidate about their performance. Coach the candidate using a strengths-based approach by helping them identify teaching practices that they have consistently mastered and integrated into their practice and those which they are on the verge of using consistently.
  • Provide opportunities for the candidate to participate in professional growth opportunities such as department meetings, professional learning communities, and district workshops.
  • Support the candidate with edTPA within the acceptable support guidelines. Note: Refer to “Guidelines for Supporting Candidates” for acceptable and unacceptable support.
  • Communicate weekly with the Practicum Faculty Supervisor regarding candidate’s progress in meeting TPEs and to address any questions or concerns. Communication may be via email, phone, or in-person visits.
  • Notify UOPX of any concerns related to the candidate’s performance, the Practicum Faculty Supervisor’s performance, or any other issues that warrant administrative attention.
  • Assist the candidate in the completion of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) which occurs at the end of clinical practice. (For multiple-subject candidates, this occurs at the end of the second/final placement).
  • Completion of the IDP is a collaborative activity between the candidate, cooperating teacher, and Practicum Faculty Supervisor. The IDP describes the candidate’s strengths, along with next steps for growth and areas of interest to explore and develop during their induction program. The IDP is a Commission on Teacher Credentialing requirement.

Evaluation of Candidate

  • Evaluate the candidate formally at the mid-term and final points of the clinical placement as scheduled. Formal evaluations are completed in your electronic portfolio. Evaluation forms must be completed and released within one week of the end of the clinical experience.
    • Mid-term & Final Evaluations are completed in your electronic portfolio
      • CT will receive an email from your electronic portfolio with login information. This email often goes to spam folder due to district firewall, so please check this folder for the email.
    • Required: 2-5 pieces of narrative evidence regarding a holistic assessment of TPEs associated with each Domain on the formal evaluation form.
      • Note: Details of formal feedback narrative requirements are shared during the 1 hour CT required self-paced UOPX webinar.
    • Please link the evaluation feedback comments to the Teacher Performance Expectations.
    • Please adhere to the definitions/descriptors of evaluation rankings: Advanced, Proficient, Developing, and Unsatisfactory
      • Note: Ranks of “Developing” are appropriate for candidates at both the mid-term and final evaluation periods. A few “developing” marks at the final evaluation do not mean the candidate is failing. Instead, they may indicate areas of growth needing continual attention as the candidate moves into his/her first years of teaching.
    • Discuss/debrief evaluations with candidate; determine next steps for growth.
    • Please contact the Education Program Specialist if you have any questions or difficulties with your electronic portfolio.

Conduct Clinical Practice Orientation Training prior to or during the first week of the clinical placement.

  • Note: Remind the candidate and cooperating teacher acknowledge the Orientation Training Checklist in TK20.

Collaborate with the candidate and cooperating teacher to ensure the principles of graduated releasing/assuming of responsibilities are occurring in the placement.

Observe the candidate a minimum of every three weeks (California state requirement).

Multiple Subject Single Subject
For each placement (8/9 weeks):
Orientation (does not count as an observation)
3 observations
One informal (use paper/pencil or electronic form)
Two formal in your electronic portfolio (mid-term and final)
For one 600 hours (approximately 16-17 weeks) placement:
Orientation (does not count as an observation)
6 observations
Four informal (use paper/pencil or electronic form)
Two formal in your electronic portfolio (mid-term and final)

Practicum Supervisor Observation Guidelines:

  • Student teacher submits detailed written lesson plan to TK20 at least 24 hours in advance of formal observation (or sooner, depending on Practicum Faculty Supervisor’s requirements)
  • Debrief after lesson (face-to-face preferred)
  • Send candidate written evaluation (either in your electronic portfolio or emailed electronic evaluation)
  • Remind the candidate to acknowledge in your electronic portfolio that formal mid-term and final evaluations were discussed with Practicum Faculty Supervisor and cooperating teacher.

Coach and guide the candidate. The College believes effective, growth producing coaching comes from a “strengths-based approach to providing feedback. Therefore, candidates should be coached to identify teaching practices that they have consistently mastered and integrated into their practice and those which they are on the verge of using consistently.

  • Feedback based on California TPEs is required.
  • Candidate should receive written feedback from all observations.

Communicate weekly with candidate via email or phone calls. Respond & provide feedback to weekly reflections and lesson plans in TK20.

  • Note: Weekly reflections are required from the candidate and are part of their clinical practice grade.

Communicate weekly with the cooperating teacher regarding candidate’s progress in meeting TPEs and to address any questions or concerns. Communication may be via email, phone call, or in-person visits.

Help resolve any issues that may occur during the clinical experience that cannot be resolved between the candidate and the cooperating teacher.

Evaluate candidate formally at the mid-term and final points of the clinical placement as scheduled. Formal evaluations are completed in your electronic portfolio. Evaluation forms must be completed and released by the date provided to you by the university.

Serve as liaison between the school (principal), cooperating teacher, and UOPX staff regarding candidate’s performance.

Notify UOPX of any concerns related to the candidate’s performance, the cooperating teacher’s performance, or any other issues that warrant administrative attention.

Support the candidate with edTPA (capstone project) within acceptable support guidelines. Ensure that the cooperating teacher assists the candidate in planning for the teaching of the edTPA lesson segment and video recording.

    Note: Refer to “Guidelines for Supporting Candidates” for acceptable and unacceptable support.

Assist the candidate in the completion of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) which occurs at the end of clinical practice. (For multiple subject candidates, this occurs at the end of the second/final placement).

Completion of this task is a collaborative activity between the candidate, cooperating teacher, andPracticum Faculty Supervisor. The IDP describes the candidate’s strengths, along with next steps for growth and areas of interest to explore and develop during their induction program. This is a Commission on Teacher Credentialing requirement.

Submit required paperwork at end of placement to TK20.


Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Resources

General Resources

  1. CA edTPA Orientation Checklist
  2. California Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Presentation
  3. Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Setting Checklist — Verification of Appropriateness – edTPA students
  4. Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Handbook – This handbook has all the information related to student teaching. Please review the entire handbook prior to beginning student teaching.
  5. TK20 Resource Guide
  6. Student Teaching Networking Guide
  7. You can access edTPA lesson plan templates at this link:

https://multimedia.phoenix.edu/site/college-of-education/student-resources/ 

FAQs

  1. What is the recommended schedule for Clinical Practice (Student Teaching)? 
  2. What is the Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) attendance policy?
    • Student Teaching is a full time responsibility. Should an unexpected need arise for an absence from student teaching, you must:
      1. Notify your Cooperating Teacher, Practicum Faculty Supervisor and Education Program Specialist to notify them of the absence.
      2. Provide your Cooperating Teacher with plans to cover any missed lessons.
      3. Enter a 0 for the day you are absent in your weekly attendance log and submit the attendance log to your Practicum Faculty Supervisor, Cooperating Teacher, and Education Program Specialist at the end of the week.
      4. Complete and email the ABSENCE Form to your Education Program Specialist for an updated end date to student teaching.
    • Note: Any missed days due to personal reasons must be made up at the end of the student teaching experience. If more than five days are missed over the course of the practicum, student teaching will be terminated and the practicum deemed “unsuccessful.”
    • Helpful Items:
      1. CA Absence Form – You must submit this form within 3 days to the education program specialist if you are absent.
      2. Attendance Log – You are required to complete this form each week and submit it electronically to your Practicum Faculty Supervisor and cooperating teacher. At the end of student teaching, you will send a signed copy to your Cooperating teacher and Practicum Faculty Supervisor.
  3. How will I be evaluated during Clinical Practice (Student Teaching)? 
  4. What happens after I successfully complete Clinical Practice (Student Teaching)?

Individual Development Plan (IDP) and Exit Survey

The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing requires all teacher candidates to complete an Individual Development Plan (IDP) and Exit Survey prior to an institutional recommendation for a Preliminary Credential. A completed IDP is placed in the candidates file and completion of the Exit Survey is noted.

The candidate is required to share the IDP with their induction mentor when they obtain their first teaching job. This document is used to develop their initial professional growth plan as a first year teacher.

The cooperating teacher/mentor and Practicum Faculty Supervisor/IFS collaborate with the candidate on the IDP by providing suggestions and input about the candidate’s areas of strength, areas they are “on the verge of getting,” and next steps for growth and improvement related to the California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). This IDP activity is done near the end of the student teaching placement.

The cooperating teacher/mentor and Practicum Faculty Supervisor/IFS collaborate with the candidate on the IDP by providing suggestions and input about the candidate’s areas of strength, areas they are “on the verge of getting,” and next steps for growth and improvement related to the California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). This IDP activity is done near the end of the student teaching placement.

For Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) candidates, the IDP and Exit Survey will be embedded in their second seminar course.

General Resources

  1. Faculty Supervisor Training
  2. CA Cooperating Teacher Training PowerPoint
  3. Individual Development Plan — UOPX BSLS MAED v7 — 2016 TPEs edTPA
  4. Individual Development Plan — UOPX MAED v8 with TPE Portfolio
  5. Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Support Plan – This can be used after informal coaching to create a clear measurable plan for improvement. Be sure to discuss this with a University contact.
  6. Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Remediation Plan – Used to help students who are borderline failing, formal documentation for improvements needed. If adequate progress is not made according to plan, student is terminated.
  7. Sample Weekly Summary Prompts
  8. TK20 Resource Guide

Individual Development Plan and Exit Survey

The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing requires all teacher candidates to complete an Individual Development Plan (IDP) and Exit Survey prior to an institutional recommendation for a Preliminary Credential. A completed IDP is placed in the candidates file and completion of the Exit Survey is noted.

The candidate is required to share the IDP with their induction mentor when they obtain their first teaching job. This document is used to develop their initial professional growth plan as a first year teacher.

The cooperating teacher/mentor and Practicum Faculty Supervisor/IFS collaborate with the candidate on the IDP by providing suggestions and input about the candidate’s areas of strength, areas they are “on the verge of getting,” and next steps for growth and improvement related to the California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). This IDP activity is done near the end of the student teaching placement.

The cooperating teacher/mentor and Practicum Faculty Supervisor/IFS collaborate with the candidate on the IDP by providing suggestions and input about the candidate’s areas of strength, areas they are “on the verge of getting,” and next steps for growth and improvement related to the California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). This IDP activity is done near the end of the student teaching placement.

For Student Teacher candidates, the IDP and Exit Survey will be embedded in their second seminar course.

Recommended Schedule for Clinical Practice (Student Teaching)

  1. Elementary Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Schedule
  2. Secondary Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Schedule
  3. Six Phases of Gradual Release and Assuming of Responsibilities

Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Attendance Policy

Student Teaching is a full time responsibility. Should an unexpected need arise for an absence from student teaching, you must:

  1. Notify your Cooperating Teacher, Practicum Faculty Supervisor and Education Program Specialist to notify them of the absence.
  2. Provide your Cooperating Teacher with plans to cover any missed lessons.
  3. Enter a 0 for the day you are absent in your weekly attendance log and submit the attendance log to your Practicum Faculty Supervisor, Cooperating Teacher, and Education Program Specialist at the end of the week.
  4. Complete and email the ABSENCE Form to your Education Program Specialist for an updated end date to student teaching.

Note: Any missed days due to personal reasons must be made up at the end of the student teaching experience. If more than five days are missed over the course of the practicum, student teaching will be terminated and the practicum deemed “unsuccessful.”

  1. CA Absence Form – Students must submit this form to the Education Program Specialist within 3 days of the absence so a new end date may be provided.
  2. Attendance Log – The student should submit this form to you weekly (electronically minus signatures). You should retrieve a final completed copy of the attendance log(s) at the end of the placement to return with packet 2.

Evaluation Information

You will complete formal evaluations in Tk20.  The forms provided show how the evaluations align to California state standards.  For all other visits/observations you must use the paper/pencil version of this form and return the paper/pencil evaluation to the Education Program Specialist.  For more information regarding the evaluation process and Tk20, visit the resources on this website.

  1. California Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Evaluation TPEs
  2. 3-Way Conference Form

Required Forms for Practicum Faculty Supervisors

edTPA Orientation Packet
  1. edTPA Orientation Checklist – acknowledge in TK20.
  2. Attendance Log – Review at Orientation/CT training – collect weekly from student electronically. Submit final completed copy with signatures at end of placement.
  3. CA Cooperating Teacher Training PowerPoint – Review at Orientation/cooperating teacher training – collect weekly from student electronically. Submit final completed copy to TK20 with signatures at end of placement.
  4. Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Setting Checklist — Verification of Appropriateness
edTPA Toolkit
  1. edTPA Overview PowerPoint
  2. Guidelines for Supporting Candidates
  3. edTPA Lesson Segment Reflection Questions
  4. edTPA Lesson Segment Template
  5. edTPA Timeline
  6. edTPA Video Release Form
  7. edTPA Tips and Tools
  8. edTPA Task 1 Tips
  9. edTPA Task 2 Tips
  10. edTPA Task 3 Tips
End of Setting Packet
  1. Attendance Log – Make sure all signatures are present and log is accurate accounting for absences. Submit to TK20 at the conclusion of student teaching. Use page 1 for the first half of student teaching and page 2 for the second half of student teaching.
  2. Faculty Supervisor Requirements – Elementary – Please submit to TK20 after each elementary setting
  3. Faculty Supervisor Requirements – Secondary – Please submit to TK20 at the end of the experience

General Resources

  1. Cooperating Teacher Training PowerPoint
  2. CA Intern Orientation PowerPoint
  3. Clinical Practice Setting Checklist — Verification of Appropriateness
  4. Cooperating Teacher edTPA Resource
  5. Guidelines for Supporting edTPA Candidates
  6. TK20 Resource Guide

Recommended Schedule for Clinical Practice (Student Teaching)

  1. Elementary Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Schedule
  2. Secondary Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Schedule
  3. Six Phases of Gradual Release and Assuming of Responsibilities

Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Attendance Policy

Student Teaching is a full time responsibility. Should an unexpected need arise for an absence from student teaching,  you must:

  1. Notify your Cooperating Teacher, Practicum Faculty Supervisor and Education Program Specialist to notify them of the absence.
  2. Provide your Cooperating Teacher with plans to cover any missed lessons.
  3. Enter a 0 for the day you are absent in your weekly attendance log and submit the attendance log to your Practicum Faculty Supervisor, Cooperating Teacher, and Education Program Specialist at the end of the week.
  4. Complete and email the ABSENCE Form to your Education Program Specialist for an updated end date to student teaching.

Note: Any missed days due to personal reasons must be made up at the end of the student teaching experience. If more than five days are missed over the course of the practicum, student teaching will be terminated and the practicum deemed “unsuccessful.”

  1. CA Absence Form – Students must submit this form to the Education Program Specialist within 3 days of the absence so a new end date may be provided.
  2. Attendance Log – The student should submit this form to you weekly (electronically minus signatures). You should retrieve a final completed copy of the attendance log(s) at the end of the placement to return with packet 2.

Evaluation Information

You will complete formal evaluations in Tk20.  The forms provided show how the evaluations align to California state standards.  For all other visits/observations you must use the paper/pencil version of this form and return the paper/pencil evaluation to the Education Program Specialist.  For more information regarding the evaluation process and Tk20, visit the resources on this website.

  1. California Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Evaluation TPEs
  2. Criteria for the Clinical Practice (Student Teaching) Evaluation

Required Forms

  1. Cooperating Teacher Pay Voucher
  2. W-9 Form – This form is requires so that the University may compensate you for your efforts as a cooperating teacher. Please type into the fields, sign and date the form, and submit it to the University supervisor or the Education Program Specialist (EPS). The supervisor, school district, or school is eligible to receive a stipend payment, per student teacher. If more than one cooperating teacher is assigned, the stipend payment will be divided accordingly.
  3. Individual Development Plan — UOPX BSLS – MAED v7 — 216 TPEs edTPA
  4. Individual Development Plan — UOPX MAED v8 with TPE Portfolio

Individual Development Plan and Exit Survey

The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing requires all teacher candidates to complete an Individual Development Plan (IDP) and Exit Survey prior to an institutional recommendation for a Preliminary Credential. A completed IDP is placed in the candidates file and completion of the Exit Survey is noted.

The candidate is required to share the IDP with their induction mentor when they obtain their first teaching job. This document is used to develop their initial professional growth plan as a first year teacher.

The cooperating teacher/mentor and Practicum Faculty Supervisor collaborate with the candidate on the IDP by providing suggestions and input about the candidate’s areas of strength, areas they are “on the verge of getting,” and next steps for growth and improvement related to the California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). This IDP activity is done near the end of the student teaching placement.

The cooperating teacher/mentor and Practicum Faculty Supervisor collaborate with the candidate on the IDP by providing suggestions and input about the candidate’s areas of strength, areas they are “on the verge of getting,” and next steps for growth and improvement related to the California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). This IDP activity is done near the end of the student teaching placement.

For Student Teacher candidates, the IDP and Exit Survey will be embedded in their second seminar course.


Student Teaching Evaluations

Student Teaching Evaluation Student Teaching Evaluation for EdTPA-track Candidates (Aligned 2016 TPEs)

Commitment to Diversity of Clinical Practice Placements

The University of Phoenix College of Education is committed to preparing teacher candidates to work effectively in diverse and inclusive settings that reflect the full diversity of K-12 student populations in California’s public schools. This commitment is aligned to the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) standards and regulations, University policies, and the College’s commitment to diversity, inclusion, and equity as reflected in the Conceptual Framework. The College’s Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity statement can be found in the Conceptual Framework section of the program handbook.

In accordance with CTC guidelines, teacher candidates are placed with districts and public schools having current Affiliation Agreements and partnerships with the College of Education that meet the definition of “all learners” from the California Teaching Performance Expectations 2016 and follow University of Phoenix procedures including:

  • Public schools with a wide range of learners that are culturally and linguistically diverse, include English Learners from a variety of language backgrounds, inclusiveness for students with special needs, and students who are socio-economically disadvantaged (CTC Guidance on Clinical Practice and Supervision of Teacher Candidates, pg 5).
  • Clinical sites with a fully qualified site administrator.
  • Cooperating teacher(s) meeting the required qualifications:
    • Clear credential in the content area for which they are providing supervision and a minimum of five years of content area K-12 experience, along with demonstration of exemplary teaching practices, including teaching content area literacy, as determined by the school district.
    • Completion of the required CTC 8-hour training
  • School site where curriculum is aligned with CA adopted content standards and frameworks.
  • Classroom environment that allows teacher candidates to complete state mandated solo and co-teaching (minimum of four weeks) and TPA assessment requirements (including videotaping of candidate and students).

Prior to confirming clinical placements, the Center for Placement and Field Experience staff ensure the setting provides the candidate with the opportunity to work with diverse populations under the mentoring of a qualified cooperating teacher.

edTPA Overview

edTPA is a pre-service teacher assessment process designed by professional teachers to prepare teacher candidates with the skills necessary to maximize their students learning potential. edTPA “is a performance-based, subject-specific assessment and support system used by teacher preparation programs throughout the United States to emphasize, measure and support the skills and knowledge that all teachers need from Day 1 in the classroom.” (edTPA, n.d). At the culmination of the teaching and learning process, the edTPA assessment includes a review of the teacher candidate’s teaching materials that demonstrate the candidate’s ability to effectively teach their subject matter to all students.

edTPA includes multiple assessments of teaching (planning, instruction, assessment and analyzing teaching). Each assessment is aligned with Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) standards, Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) standards and the Common Core State Standards Initiative. By producing quality teacher education graduates the College of Education will strengthen their reputation in the marketplace and attain a competitive advantage to set us apart as leaders of this national initiative.

For more access to edTPA handbooks and other relevant resources, go to:

https://multimedia.phoenix.edu/education/student-resources/

edTPA is a capstone performance-based portfolio assessment requiring teacher candidates to demonstrate their readiness for full-time classroom teaching and helping all students maximize their learning potential. This assessment was designed by educators to answer this essential question: “Is the teacher candidate ready for the job of teaching all children in California and the nation’s public schools?”

edTPA is aligned to and assesses candidate’s mastery of the California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) and the relevant Common Core standards, California student academic content standards and/or curriculum frameworks. A passing score on edTPA is required for licensure as a teacher in California. Developed at Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE), in partnership with the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, edTPA is used by teacher preparation programs across the United States.

The focus of the edTPA teaching event is on TK-12 student learning, with particular attention to students with diverse cultural, language, and socio-economic backgrounds, and learning needs. edTPA requires aspiring teachers to demonstrate readiness to teach through instructional practices designed to support their students’ learning and to make subject matter accessible to all; engage students in real world and inquiry learning; analyze whether their students are learning; and adjust their instruction to become more effective. edTPA is a valid and reliable measure of teacher candidates’ knowledge and skills. This assessment of teacher candidate performance is embedded in both the Multiple- and Single-subject programs.

What do Candidates do?

edTPA assesses teacher candidates’ planning, instructing, assessing, and analyzing of a learning segment in a specific content area. A learning segment consists of 3-5 sequential lessons connected to a central focus (specific content theme based on California state content standards). Evidence of teaching competence consists of authentic artifacts (lesson plans, instructional materials, unedited teaching videos, and student assessments/work) documenting teaching and learning during the learning segment and commentaries explaining, analyzing, and reflecting on the artifacts.

Teacher candidates prepare their edTPA portfolio during clinical practice (student teaching). In constructing their edTPA portfolio, candidates apply learnings from coursework and clinical experiences about research, theory and effective practices related to teaching and learning. The assessment features a common architecture focused on three tasks: Planning, Instruction, and Assessment. Candidates submit their completed edTPA portfolio to Pearson, the organization responsible for facilitating national scoring by subject experts hired and trained by Pearson. edTPA final scores are reviewed by University of Phoenix (UOPX) credential analysts and are included with all other requirements for recommendation for the Preliminary Credential.

Task 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment (including Academic Language Support)

Candidates provide evidence of their ability to select, adapt, or design learning tasks and assessments that offer all students equitable access to curriculum content. Candidates also identify a key language function and then analyze and develop academic language related to that function. Artifacts include 3-5 consecutive lesson plans, instructional materials, student assignments and assessments, and written planning commentary.

Task 2: Instruction and Engaging Students in Learning

Candidates provide evidence of their ability to create a positive learning environment and to engage student in meaningful learning tasks and demonstrate how they facilitate students’ developing understanding of the content. They will also analyze students’ use of academic language either here or in the assessment. Artifacts include one or two unedited video clips of 15-20 minutes from one of the 3-5 consecutive learning segments and written instructional commentary.

Task 3: Assessing Student Learning

Candidates demonstrate how they analyze and diagnose their students’ learning and use assessment information to plan future instruction. The task focuses on just one of the assessments from the learning segment. Artifacts include classroom assessment of the whole class and cases of individual student learning over time (evaluation criteria), student work samples, evidence of the teacher candidate’s feedback, and written assessment commentary.

Multiple Subject Candidates – Task 4: Math

UOPX multiple subject candidates complete the Elementary Education: Literacy with Mathematics Task 4.

Candidates’ evidence is also evaluated and scored on two additional dimensions of teaching:

Analysis of Teaching Effectiveness is addressed in commentaries within Planning, Instruction, and Assessment tasks. In planning, candidates justify their plans based on the candidate’s knowledge of diverse students’ learning strengths, needs and principles of research and theory. In instruction, candidates explain and justify which aspects of the learning segment were effective and what they would change to improve students’ learning. Candidates use their analysis of assessment results to inform next steps for individuals and groups with varied learning needs. Candidates also use assessment results to inform ways to improve their instructional practices.

Academic Language Development is evaluated based on candidate’s ability to support students’ oral and written use of academic language to deepen subject matter understandings. Candidates explain how students demonstrate academic language using student work samples and/or video recordings of student engagement.

edTPA Passing Standard

Passing scores for each edTPA assessment area have been determined by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

California Teaching Credential edTPA Handbook California Passing Score Standard
Multiple Subject: Elementary Elementary Education: Literacy with Mathematics Task 4 49
Single Subject: Secondary
Visual Arts Visual Arts
41
Biological Sciences Secondary Science 41
Chemistry Secondary Science 41
English Secondary English-Language Arts 41
Foundational-level General Science Secondary Science 41
Foundational-level Mathematics Secondary Math 41
Geosciences Secondary Science 41
MathematicsSecondary Math 41
Physical Education Physical Education 41
Physics Secondary Science 41
Social Studies Secondary History/Social Studies 41

edTPA Score Reporting

  • edTPA submission due dates and score reports are released according to the following schedules:
  • Candidates will receive individual score profiles. The candidate score profiles will include the score obtained on each of the edTPA rubrics, overall performance information, and supplementary narrative that provides the rubric language descriptions of candidate’s performance for each of their rubric scores. The candidate profile focuses on the candidate’s performance at that score point level as descried by the scoring rubric.
  • Educator Preparation Programs will receive scores for candidates who selected the educator preparation program as a score recipient upon registration. UOPX California teacher candidates must select “UOPX-California” as the score recipient. Programs will receive the score obtained on each of the edTPA rubrics and overall performance information.

Candidate Remediation Procedures

Candidates who do not pass the edTPA are assigned formal remediation with a faculty coach for counseling and development of a remediation plan before attempting to re-take the chosen task(s). The remediation process provides candidates with an in-depth review of their Rubrics and Evaluator comments for the task(s), identification of specific support materials they may need, and a timeline for task preparation, registration, and resubmission. Candidates may not re-submit edTPA work until cleared by their faculty coach/advisor.

  • Candidates can find important information in Guidelines for edTPA Retake Decision-making and Support.
  • Before registering, candidates should review the Instructions for edTPA Retake.
  • Candidates can register for only one retake at a time (either full-assessment retake or partial retake). Candidates must wait to receive scores from their last submission before they can register for another retake.
  • Score void. If edTPA scores were voided as a final determination of the administrative review process, a candidate will submit a full assessment retake to receive scores for the fulfillment of program and/or state requirements. Review the guidance provided in the Instruction for edTPA Retake.

Candidate Appeal and Assessment Rescoring Procedures

Candidates receive results of edTPA approximately 2-3 weeks after submission. The California Program Chair and faculty coach will meet with the candidate to determine if an appeal is warranted.

A Score Confirmation request is the process for appealing a score.

If a candidate believes that a score (not a condition code) on one or more rubrics was reported in error, they may submit a request for a score confirmation in writing, for a fee. Information about the score confirmation services and fee is available on edTPA.com.

Please note that only one score confirmation request is permitted per submission and requests received after the initial score confirmation request will not be honored.

If a candidate is unsure why a condition code was assigned to one or more rubric score profiles, please refer to information on the score profile. The performance description(s) provide information regarding any condition code(s) assigned. For additional information about condition codes, please review edTPA Submission Requirements and Condition Codes.

edTPA Scorer Experience

Scorers for edTPA must meet the criteria outline in the Scorer Experience Qualifications.

Scorers may be current or retired higher education faculty, field supervisors, teacher preparation program administrators and other higher education educators at a state-endorsed teacher preparation program. Scorers may also be retired PK-12 classroom teachers, induction or peer assistance mentor/coaches, National Board-Certified Teachers, school principals or other PK12 administrators (e.g. assistant principal, Dean of Students, etc.)

Scorers have content-specific expertise in the content area they score.

Candidate Advisement on edTPA

How does the educator preparation program support candidates in completing the edTPA? University of Phoenix College of Education takes a comprehensive approach to candidate advisement for the edTPA. Throughout the program, candidates are introduced to edTPA requirements and procedures, materials, and College website resources. Candidates are exposed to the edTPA Cycle of Effective Teaching, lesson planning elements, specific edTPA language used, and the structure of the edTPA, along with having multiple formative opportunities to “practice the activities of edTPA and to synthesize their learning from the program” (SCALE, 2016).

The program provides edTPA materials such as:

  • edTPA Handbook (specific to credential area being sought)
    • edTPA Handbook = directions for all tasks and rubrics
  • Commentary = template (Word document) for writing all tasks
  • “Making Good Choices”
    • Support guide (reference) for edTPA candidates to assist with making good choices as they develop artifacts and commentaries.

edTPA is considered an open assessment in that candidates can seek assistance with clarifying questions from trained edTPA faculty, Practicum Faculty Supervisors, and program coordinators. Student teaching seminar faculty provide weekly support to candidates in the preparation of their edTPA work. Seminar instructors explain in detail edTPA tasks and scoring rubrics. Candidates may request one-on-one support from a faculty coach as well. All edTPA support providers follow the edTPA Guidelines for Acceptable Candidate Support.

Candidate’s final submission must represent their own work. The candidate may not:

  • Receive assistance editing drafts prior to submission.
  • Ask for and receive critique of their work that provides specific, alternative responses.
  • Receive assistance selecting which video clips or student work samples to select for submission

How does the cooperating teacher support the candidate in completing the edTPA?

The cooperating teacher’s role includes:

  • Follow the edTPA Guidelines for Acceptable Candidate Support
  • Work with teacher candidate to determine the class and identify the unit and lesson segment to be taught (3-5 consecutive lessons)
  • Guide understanding of curriculum organization in the classroom/district. Work with candidate to secure appropriate materials for the lesson segment.
  • Ask the candidate probing and clarifying questions regarding draft edTPA responses, without providing direct edits or specific suggestions about the candidate’s work.
  • Provide feedback relative to candidate’s demonstration of competency on the TPE domains.
  • Give the candidate full responsibility for planning, teaching and assessing the class.
  • Understand the candidate must secure video permission using the forms provided or the district’s required video permission form.
  • Assist with video recording of candidate working with students
  • Build candidate’s confidence as a teacher and offer emotional support

Program Completion and Licensure

This is an exciting time! Make sure that you check and understand the requirements for successful program completion and eligibility for licensure recommendation.

The time limit between completion of coursework and institutional recommendation (IR) for license or endorsement is 12 months. Failure to complete the IR process within this time period will result in a program review and may require additional coursework or assessments for currency.

  1. Program Completion
    • Completed Course Work
    • Submitted TPA (All Tasks)
    • Finished Student Teaching Successfully
    • Good Academic & Financial Status
    • Submitted Graduation Application
  2. Institutional Recommendation (IR)
    • Completed Individual Development Plan (IDP)
    • COE Exit Survey
    • Completed CPR Training
    • Passed RICA (Multi-subject)
    • Passed TPA
    • Submitted and Paid for Application Credential
    • Coursework in U.S. Constitution and Health Education (with a grade of “C” or better).
  3. Teaching Certificate

Alternative Paths

SB 57 – Alternative Path Using Private School Experience

California residents may have the qualifications to waive the student teaching practicum experience and course work, (ELM/590 and ELM/595 OR SEC/590 and SEC/595). Students will need to meet all the qualifications listed below, as well as complete the remaining courses in their program in order to graduate. California students who are eligible for student teaching waivers under SB 57 do not need to complete the Teacher Performance Assessment Tasks.

Students with accredited private school teaching experience may waive their student teaching requirements for a credential. California Education Code 44259.2 allows the Commission to use three years of full-time teaching experience in an accredited private school in lieu of the student teaching component. The following defines the accredited private school experience and the verification procedures:

Qualifications:

  • Three years of full-time accredited private school teaching experience must be at the same level and in the same subject area of the credential sought.
  • California private school teaching experience must be in an accredited private school. California private schools must be accredited by the Western States Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and must be verified by the private school’s WASC Certificate or letter from the Accreditation Commission.
  • Out-of-state private school teaching experience must be acquired at a school with regional accreditation, which must be verified by a certificate or a letter to the private school from the regional accrediting body.
  • The three years of experience must be verified on official letterhead of the school signed by the director of personnel, principal, or director.
  • Two years of rigorous performance evaluations must be submitted with written authenticity by a personnel officer, principal, or director. At least one of the evaluations must have been conducted within the last two years of private school teaching. Evaluations must be satisfactory or better.

The rigorous performance evaluations must include the teacher’s effectiveness in the following areas:

  1. The use of teaching strategies that motivate all students to engage in the learning process.
  2. Demonstration of classroom management skills that maintain high standards for student behavior.
  3. Demonstration of knowledge of the subject taught and the use of diverse and appropriate instructional strategies that promote student understanding.
  4. The ability to plan lessons and implement a sequence of appropriate instructional activities.
  5. The ability to communicate effectively by presenting ideas and instructions clearly and meaningfully to all students.
  6. The ability to evaluate and assess student achievement.
  7. Completion of the following coursework:
    • Multiple Subject: SEC/586, SEC/587
    • Single Subject: ELM/586, ELM/587

If you have questions, or are interested in participating in the SB 57 path, please contact your California Credential Analyst.

Nicole.Brainard@Phoenix.edu

Jeanie.Shelton@Phoenix.edu

Intern Credential Opportunities

Intern Credential Opportunities for MAED/TED Students

Candidates in California may qualify for an intern credential in California public schools while enrolled in the MAED/TED program. The intern credential may allow students to accept a teaching contract, serve as teacher of record, and/or validate student teaching requirements in their own classroom while completing their MAED/TED program. However, the University does not hire or assist in placing candidates at the district, nor does acceptance of a teaching contract guarantee eligibility to apply and be recommended for the intern credential.

The California Commission has identified the below requirements for eligibility of single-subject or multiple-subject interns.

  • Candidates must provide verification of each of the following requirements:
  1. Meet Basic Skills Requirements as outlined by the CTC: https://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/leaflets/basic-skills-requirement-(Cl-677)
  2. Meet subject matter competency by one of the options outlined by the CTC below:
  3. Completion of a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution
  4. Letter of Intent to Hire for California public school
  5. Completion of 60 hours of Field Experience with diverse students
  6. Certificate of Clearance (or other applicable CTC-issued document)
  7. Continuous enrollment* in the University of Phoenix MAED/TED-E or S (Elementary or Secondary Education teacher preparation degree program). *Note: Students are considered continuously enrolled if they have not been out of attendance more than 365 days from the last date of positive recorded attendance, until all academic program requirements have been completed.
  8. Continuous employment within approved California public school:
    • If the student is offered a teaching opportunity within the same school district, they must immediately notify UOPX to determine if the new site/setting is aligned with their credential area and meets the site requirements. If the new site meets the requirements, they are able to continue with their internship credential.
    • If the student is offered a teaching opportunity outside of the initial approved school district, they must immediately notify UOPX. Upon this notification, UOP will work with the new school district to determine the new site/setting is aligned with their credential area and meets the site requirements. If the site meets the requirements, UOPX notifies CTC of the new district information.
    • If at any time the student or district chooses to terminate the student’s employment, the student must notify UOPX immediately. Upon this notification, UOPX will immediately notify the CTC. The student will need to reapply for their internship credential and meet all eligibility requirements if they would like to be considered at a future date.
  9. Intern credentials are valid for two years. If candidates were on an internship credential at another institution, they will need to provide a letter of academic good standing from their previous university as part of their eligibility requirements to continue with the intern credential at UOPX. If they are recommended for a new intern credential, the validity period will not reset.  
  10. US Constitution (2 semester units earned with a “C” or better, a grade of C- is not accepted for certification, or exam)
  11. Good academic standing (including no current open Supplemental Standards referrals).
  12. Immunizations: The state of California requires negative TB testing or chest x-ray (dated no more than four years) prior to entering the classroom. Please note, al school facilities serving K-12 students are required to monitor the COVID-19 vaccination status or weekly testing of all “workers” on-site, including student teachers. See CA Public Health Office Order.
  13. Completion of the following coursework:
    Multiple Subject:
    • V07CA: MTE/506CA; MTE/518CA; ELL/500; SPE/514CA; RDG/537CA; MTE/522CA
    • V08CA/V09CA: MTE/511; ELM/533; ELL/500; MTE/512; RDG/556; ELM/532

Single Subject:

  • V07CA: MTE/506CA; SEC/508CA; ELL/500; SPE/514CA; RDG/542CA; MTE/523CA
  • V08CA/V09CA: MTE/511; SEC/533; ELL/501; MTE/512; RDG/558; SEC/532

If an intern candidate no longer meets the intern credential requirements listed above, their internship credential will be rescinded and the employing district and California Commission on Teacher Credentialing will be notified.

If you are interested in the intern credential, please contact a CA credential analyst.

CA Credential Analysts:

Nicole.Brainard@Phoenix.edu

Jeanie.Shelton@Phoenix.edu

Student Access to Past Courses and Materials

Students have access to past Blackboard Ultra courses indefinitely. You may want to access the syllabus and course materials for past courses throughout your program.

CTEL

The California Teacher of English Learners® program has been developed by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) as a method for teachers to demonstrate competence in the knowledge and skill areas necessary for effective teaching of English Learners.

University of Phoenix offers non-degree courses available for candidates seeking a Cross-cultural Language and University of Phoenix offers non-degree courses available for candidates seeking a Cross-cultural Language and Academic Development certificate (CLAD) in California. The collection of coursework offered as part of the California Teachers of English Learners (CTEL) program was designed and guided by University of Phoenix’s CTEL Philosophy.

Course IdCourse TitleCreditsLengthPrerequisites
CTEL/501Language and Language Development48 weeks
CTEL/502Assessment and Instruction48 weeks
CTEL/503Culture and Inclusion48 weeks

Candidates must meet the following eligibility requirements prior to placement in CTEL coursework:

1. Possess a valid California Teaching Credential, Single Subject, Multiple Subject, Life, Preliminary, Speech-Language Pathology or Clinical or Rehabilitative Services Credential with a Special Class Authorization, School Nurse Services Credential with a Special Teaching Authorization in Health, Visiting Faculty Permit, Children’s Center Permit (excluding emergency), or Child Development Permit (excluding Assistant and Associate Permits) that authorizes the holder to provide instruction to pupils.

Note: The following are not appropriate prerequisite credentials or permits: Emergency Permits, Provisional Internship Permits, Short-Term Staff Permits, District Intern Credentials, University Intern Credentials, Exchange Credentials Sojourn, Certificated Employee Credentials, or Services credentials without a special class authorization.

Candidates who meet all CTEL requirements may apply for a CLAD institutional recommendation (IR).

In order for the University of Phoenix to issue CLAD IR a candidate must meet the following requirements:

1. All coursework for certification must have been completed within the last five (5) years.

2. Candidates must earn a grade of C or better on all coursework for certification.

3. A candidate must complete a minimum of one CTEL course with the university.

The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) provides the following options to satisfy the knowledge, skills and abilities required for the CLAD certificate:

1. Completion of course work in a Commission-approved CTEL program.

2. Passing scores on Tests 1, 2, and 3 of the California Teacher of English Learners (CTEL) Examinations. Scores used for certification purposes may be no older than ten years from the individual passed exam dates.

3. Completion of coursework in a Commission-approved CTEL program combined with passing scores on the CTEL Examination, based on equivalency as determined by a Commission-approved CTEL program.

Candidates must provide documentation of course completion and/or exam passing scores. For additional information refer to English Learner Authorization—CLAD Certificate (CL-628C).

Program requirements may change based upon updates from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. California program requirements can be viewed on the teacher licensure page.